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I'm trying to make a curved transition between some perpendicular planes (mocked up here with Photoshop): enter image description here

What's the best way to go about this? Perhaps creating some kind of curved edge? I tried using a bevel, but nothing happened.

File here if it's useful: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3TF2HeeQRyWRlRyQUcyMjhtaHM/view?usp=sharing

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    $\begingroup$ The file you linked to doesn't look like the one in the screenshot. $\endgroup$
    – PGmath
    Jul 20, 2015 at 1:41

3 Answers 3

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Another possible way to achieve this shape is to use actual curves.

In Object mode Shift + A and add a new Bezier Curve. Enter its Edit mode, pressShift + Tab and set snaping mode to Vertex; select one of curve vertices and grab it, hovering your mouse over vertex in the corner of your base mesh:

Do the same with another vertex of the curve and turn off vertex snapping (again Shift+Tab). Now to setup curve shape begin rotating and scaling its vertices along X or Y axis (depends on your scene) to get desired form:

enter image description here

After converting it to mesh, enter Edit mode select all vertices and extrude upwards. With extruded vertices still selected scale them to 0 by Z axis. Now again turn on Shift + Tab and grab extruded vertices, they will align with top corner of the base mesh. Select all, W > Remove doubles. The result can look like this:

enter image description here

With everything selected, press E and this time choose axis to extrude along the base mesh.

After extruding, setting Shading to Smooth and adding Edge Split modifier the result will look similar to this:

enter image description here

The advantage of this approach is that you can create pretty much any shape of the corner by simply editing the curve in the beginning.

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  • $\begingroup$ Couldn't get the extruded vertices to be in a straight line. When I had them all selected and changed Z to 0, only one of them would be at Z = 0. I extruded higher than the edge and used the knife tool to cut a straight line. Other than that, Bezier was much more effective than Bridge. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Aubrie
    Jul 23, 2015 at 23:06
  • $\begingroup$ It seems to me you haven't used scale tool (S), rather than grabbing. It's showed here in more detail what I did. I hope it can help you not to make extra step with knife tool in other similar cases. $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Jul 25, 2015 at 16:29
  • $\begingroup$ Wow, didn't even know that was possible. Using S worked great. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Aubrie
    Jul 26, 2015 at 0:42
  • $\begingroup$ try keeping a full quad mesh if you need to use a subsurf $\endgroup$
    – Bithur
    Jul 31, 2015 at 21:09
  • $\begingroup$ @Bithur You mean making its end on the left top consist of an edge rather than vertice? I know of reasons why this approach is preferable, even wrote rather basic answer about this, hoping that it could be useful.But in this case I think it's not so important (probably I should mention in the answer why) - I didn't use Subsurf and wasn't going. If I would of course I'd add another edge loop and crease those edges connecting the corner to the wall. $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Jul 31, 2015 at 22:57
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You can use the bridge in the loop tools addon with a negative value in the cubic interpolation. enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Didn't provide enough curvature without ghosting through the rest of the mesh, but still very useful to know. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Aubrie
    Jul 23, 2015 at 22:16
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In some situations which appear similar to this one, you might be able to use the bevel modifier. In this case, the fact that the faces in your screen shot are distributed between two different objects is one of the issues that makes this a less than optimal solution.

I've found the easiest way to do similar things in my own projects is to add more geometry. In this case, I would add a cylinder, either in edit mode or object mode, orient it so the length of the cylinder is parallel to the x axis in your ~.blend file. Then flatten the cylinder a bit by scaling along the z axis to the point where it has the desired appearance. Next, making sure you are in edit mode, select all of the vertices of the cylinder, then deselect the vertices of the cylinder that approximate the part of the geometry you wish to create. Delete all of the selected vertices, and you should be left with a curved surface approximating to a greater or lesser degree the surface you wish to add. You may need to flip the normals of the faces comprising the cylindrical surface you just added, and you'll need to connect them to the other objects in the scene.

Adding the cylinder to one of the two objects already in your scene by adding in edit mode may save a step later one.

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