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I tried different settings, but I haven't received the desired result. Either the animation is smooth but first it slow then speeds up and then slows down at the end (Bezier) or animation rude but it has one speed (Linear).
Example:
enter image description here
Is there a way to make the animation smooth and have it play with one speed without acceleration & deceleration?

The image above is the simplest way to visualize what i mean, but the image in this link shows the kind of objects i'm animating, and it behaves quite abrupt when Linear, but Bezier gives pronounced easing in-out:

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  • $\begingroup$ All lifelike animation is done using Arcs, and a bit of easing in and out replicates the Inertia experienced in real world objects. Here are the 12 principles of animation, to reiterate $\endgroup$ – zeffii Jun 13 '15 at 12:08
  • $\begingroup$ While different interpolations make simple animations easy, when you get into more complex animations like characters, you should expect to set a keyframe nearly every frame for key parts of the armature. $\endgroup$ – sambler Jun 14 '15 at 11:31
  • $\begingroup$ Due to the acceleration and deceleration the animation looks bad and than more intermediate frames than animation looks worse. That is why I would like to know how to make a smooth animation without changing the speed. $\endgroup$ – Juliya Jun 14 '15 at 17:09
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One possible solution to the question (before it was updated with a use-case):

You could build curves into the corners of a trajectory path, like:

enter image description here

Tighter corners will result in more jumpy (sudden, unrealistic) movement.

Here I start out with a Mesh Object, then use Ctrl+Shift+B to fillet the corners, then in Edit Mode use Alt+C and convert the mesh to a Curve Object.

Then Add a Follow Path constraint, and press Animate Path, then press Play to see what that looks like.

enter image description here

Sometimes It can be more convenient to see the path it will be on, rather than key-framing it.

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