7
$\begingroup$

I'm trying to create a complex beveled bezier (bezier curve with a spline object as the bevel). It needs to have the same Z+Y scale throughout the object but the X axis needs to scale to widen to fit the letter shape.

In edit mode with a vertex selected and using Alt+S I can scale the control point and get the scale I want one the X axis ... but ... I am also getting Y/Z scaling.

Is there a way to lock the axis with this scaling mode or another way for me to scale the way I am looking for? The image show a single control point scaled but I'd want to scale the others to fill the C shape on X without changing the other 2.

I haven't played with using a Taper object but given how I'm trying to fit a very specific shape, scaling the points would seem to be the best way to have precise scale.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

In order to keep a consistent profile to the letter (the I-beam pattern), as well as have a fatter width to the left side of the letter, you won't be able to accomplish this with a curve bevel, even when using the taper object as well. This is because the radius is applied in a circular fashion around the control point.

Another way to do it is to create an outline mesh with a thin border, convert it to a curve object and position over top of a second curve object, converted from the text object to a 2d curve object. Extrude both for thickness, and extrude the border curve a little further to get the I-beam profile you need.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I-beam was the best example I had of the geometry I'm looking for but as I'm recreating a mesh that has other meshes dependent on the rounded geometry I've settled on creating the optimal path with the scaling and then going back and extruding the shape manually along the same arcs and rotations. I definitely appreciate the answers. Having a way to limit scaling of control points to an axis would have been beautiful as I could go back and redo the resolution for various uses, but I can take the extra time to make multiple versions with multires. Just means hours instead of minutes :) $\endgroup$ – Jahf Jun 9 '15 at 19:39
  • $\begingroup$ No problem. I'd be interested in seeing your solution in action. $\endgroup$ – Todd McIntosh Jun 9 '15 at 19:41
  • $\begingroup$ Recognizing that in most cases your 2nd example would have been completely sufficient, I'm marking it as the answer and adding points to both. If someone else finds a way to limit the control point scaling (perhaps a future version), adding it here would be very welcome, but I've got the answer for the current version of Blender's modelling. $\endgroup$ – Jahf Jun 9 '15 at 19:42
  • $\begingroup$ (Todd ... I'll post some images for the final result to show what I was going for, probably a couple of days) $\endgroup$ – Jahf Jun 9 '15 at 19:42
  • $\begingroup$ Sounds good, I'm always interested in typographic techniques in Blender. $\endgroup$ – Todd McIntosh Jun 9 '15 at 19:43
4
$\begingroup$

When you scale a control point you're scaling its radius around the curve, which is inherently circular. The only way to get a flat profile is to use a second bevel object with a thin rectangular shape. Once you apply that bevel object, scaling the cp radius only affects width in the way you want.

In my example, I found a better result with a low curve resolution (4-5), and then applying a subdiv modifier with level 3.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks :) Unfortunately it looks like even that method is still changing the other thicknesses more than will work for what I'm building. It definitely mitigates the thickness a large degree but even a fraction of the thickness changing is too much for the model I'm doing. I've actually got it built as a mesh where I just did a bunch of manual extrusions and vertex rotations of the spline, but am hoping to create it in a way I can do some extreme high resolution renders and not have vertex corners appear. I may just have to bite the bullet and redo it with a lot more extrusions. $\endgroup$ – Jahf Jun 8 '15 at 8:18
  • $\begingroup$ Well, what about tracing the outline of the letter with the curve in 2d mode, and then extruding it? It would have a totally flat profile then. $\endgroup$ – Todd McIntosh Jun 8 '15 at 12:19
  • $\begingroup$ Not building totally flat, see the top image for the profile. The cross-section of the letter is similar to an I-beam (the C becomes a stylized vice clamp when done). I'm using the I-beam shape to bevel the curve. $\endgroup$ – Jahf Jun 8 '15 at 21:41
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think you're going to be able to get the result you want from a curve bevel. What about combining to extruded 2d curves, one with the border edge extruded further than the second which create the inset interior surface? $\endgroup$ – Todd McIntosh Jun 8 '15 at 22:16
2
$\begingroup$

Here's a solution that I think works pretty well:

1: Create a thin, rectangular cuboid and add an array modifier.

enter image description here

2: Add a bezier curve in the shape of your "C", and then add it as a curve modifier to the cuboid.

enter image description here

3: Set the radius on each control point to whatever you like (alt-s in edit mode).

enter image description here

4: Add a large, flat cuboid at the thickness you want your letter to be. Then add a boolean modifier on the original object and set it to intersect with the large cuboid you just added.

enter image description here

Once you get the hang of it it's not too bad. And the nice thing is that it's non-destructive.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.