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For example in this image, This node is labeled as Background but I think this is an emission node from the parameter it has. But in general, if the name has been altered , How can I find out which type of nodes it is ?

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ If you're connected to the internet you can right click > Online Manual which will open the documentation page for the node. The Background node is particular because it is its own node, although it acts as an Emission node docs.blender.org/manual/en/4.1/render/shader_nodes/shader/… $\endgroup$
    – Gorgious
    Commented Jun 17 at 8:17

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F2⌦ Del↩ Enter Clear the label. Now you see the original name again.

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    $\begingroup$ @andio Apart from the answer given here, your screenshot clearly says you are editing the World shader. It is an Emission shader, but it is called Background and does not exist in the Object shaders. That's why the output is called Background as well, and not Emission like in the regular Emission shader. But they act exactly the same, you can exchange the Background shader for the Emission shader. See this, both nodes are called "Background", but look at the outputs: node labels & outputs $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 17 at 8:02
  • $\begingroup$ @GordonBrinkmann Thanks for the explanation. This is just simple example I used (world shader). In reality , most of the times when I got project from someone else, a lot of the nodes has been renamed so I'm having problem to find out what nodes it is as i'm trying to learn and find it from the 'add' menu. I hope there's easier way to do it without have to delete the name first , for example, I use Nuke for comp, where I can press 'I' to show the class of the selected Node. $\endgroup$
    – andio
    Commented Jun 17 at 13:06
  • $\begingroup$ @andio Often the colors of the label bar and the parameters give a hint. Anyway, this answer by Markus solves your problem. The Background shader was probably just an unfortunate choice since it is actually the real name of the shader by Blender itself, but it is also basically just an Emission shader with other names. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 17 at 13:11
  • $\begingroup$ This is why you shouldn't rename your nodes. CTRL+J and name a frame if you want to comment what the node does. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 17 at 13:19
  • $\begingroup$ @MarkusvonBroady Yep. Even here people sometimes show nodetrees with renamed nodes without explanation as answer to the question of a beginner who might easily be confused. The same with hidden unused sockets. Even with the correct name this sonetimes leads to confusion because a beginner might think he has the wrong node when they have more inputs and/or outputs than shown in the solution. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 17 at 16:25

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