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I extrude along the Z-axis make the control loops etc. but when I use subdivision it glitches. Is there something wrong with my topology or do I have double layers of something? Edges are made with the bevel tool.

Any way to fix this without starting all over? Thanks.

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On the side that has a 90 degree angel this topology solved the issue:

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However, the same technique made it only worse on the side with a slight angle on it.

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It looks like the subdivision pulls the edges above the original face from which the inset was made on...

Trying to make quads only?

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Result got even worse... :-)

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    $\begingroup$ Oh come on... first I deleted my answer because you wrote your own, now I started commenting on your answer and then you deleted that. Give me a chance to help you ;) I was going to say: The Subdivision Surface modifier does not really like n-gons. So you have to add edges with the Knife tool (as you already answered yourself) to create quads by for example extending the edges from the corners to the outer edges. But of course you have to do this wherever the mesh is not "subdivision-friendly". $\endgroup$ Commented May 6 at 11:41
  • $\begingroup$ The shading is not fixed in the updated post, your model still has some N-gons. $\endgroup$
    – KISKAart
    Commented May 6 at 11:44
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answers! And my apologies Gordon Brinkmann, I got too excited "solving" the issue wrong apparently :D I added what I believe quads now and still doesn't work. Could you printscreen one of my latest pictures and mark which areas are N-gons because apparently I don't fully understand what that means... $\endgroup$
    – Sokrates
    Commented May 6 at 12:01
  • $\begingroup$ Making "quads only" is the correct solution, but you are not making "quads only". I mean sure, you make some - but there are still a lot of n-gons. Your screenshot does not show all the vertices, but if I would make an assumption I can guess there are at least 7 vertices on each of those two faces here from your screenshot: n-gons $\endgroup$ Commented May 6 at 12:20
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, everything with more than 4 vertices is called n-gon. But to say everything you made so far is garbage is nonsense, I suspect it comes from people telling you the myth to model always only with quads. This is not necessarily true in general, it depends on what you want to do. For hard surface modeling it is often not necessary, also beveling edges usually works with n-gons without issues. It is things like loop cuts, subdidivision surface etc. which work better or even exclusively with quads, because for some operations it is necessary to have a clear direction for splitting faces etc. $\endgroup$ Commented May 6 at 13:01

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Your model has N-gons, add some loopcuts and connect vertices with J or use a knife tool to cut these N-gons.

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