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How can I hide this seam on the torus texture?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi. Please use a title that matches the content of the question. It should be descriptive but succinct, unique and identifying, summarizing the issue so that anyone searching for a similar problem is likely to find it. Remove anything superfluous, avoid using words like "this", "help with", "issue" or "question about", instead describe what "it" is. Remember, your title is the first thing potential visitors see, answers you get depend heavily on how insightful it is. See What is the problem of asking “How do I do this?" $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 12 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ Note that, if you weren't using a procedural texture, the "trivial" UV mapping of a torus results in seamless texturing when a tileable texture is used. (Unfortunately I don't know of a way to make procedural noise periodic, which would be a "better" solution than any so far given.) $\endgroup$
    – Matthew
    Commented Mar 12 at 21:32

4 Answers 4

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You can "symmetrize" the UV coordinates:

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Recenter X (as the vector mapping is rotated 90°) between -0.5 and 0.5 and take the absolute value.

Or more, simply:

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Note: there are two seams in fact, but the second one (in the inner part of the torus is not visible). You could symmetrize on Y too.

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In addition to the wonderful answers already here, I will point out a solution that doesn't utilize material nodes. This may be useful for situations where a mesh and its UV map need to be exported to a game engine or other software into which Blender's material data does not translate.

Mark seams and unwrap your mesh

Example material reveals the presence of a seam:

Enable UV Sync Selection and select the part to be mirrored

Place the 2D Cursor in the center (0.5) at the axis of symmetry

Set the 2D Cursor as the Pivot Point

(Be sure you are in the UV Editor when you do this. There is a similar operation for the 3D Cursor in mesh Edit Mode, so don't confuse the two.)

Scale -1 on the x axis

(or whichever axis applies to your UV layout)

UV symmetry makes the seam less noticeable.

Note: If the empty half of the UV layout feels like a waste of space to you, you can place the 2D Cursor back at x:0 and, once the whole UV is selected, scale up double on the x axis. Whether this is necessary/desirable will depend on you and your specific project. I'm just pointing it out as something worth being aware of.

Usage: There are other ways to hide a seam that involve proper texture mapping, of course. But for situations where merely making the texture symmetrical will suffice, this technique can be employed. Of course I'm not suggesting this technique is always the best way to hide a seam, but if simple symmetry is all that's needed, this technique can satisfy the requirements.

related reading

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If you interpret 0->1 U and V as 0->2pi angles, they can sweep round their own circles in 4-space

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The XYZW can be used in a 4D texture, and it will be seamless in both directions:

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.. like so:

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Included in this blend is another group, which, given Object texture coordinates, will yield a radial, cylindrical texture space: XYZ in, to theta1,radius,Z -> (Vector), theta2 -> (W) out. Seamless in the XY ring, and linear in Z.

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You can't because you can't make the procedural texture join with the Texture Coordinate UV output (edit: except with Lemon's method lol), maybe there's another way but you could try this setup instead (use the Object output instead) even though it is not perfect as it squeezes the texture on Z but no on the other axis:

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