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I have problems with importing revit models in my work, the model is made in revit and I after I render with blender.

the most important problem is that when I attempt a brick texture to the walls, the mesh of the object is irregular. Normally, I use cube projection (uv mapping) and everything is ready, but when I scale the texture so that you have the correct size, it loses the right projection.

I wonder if there is any way to make this easy, or easier to make the mesh again?

  • Projection for view in ortho view does not work because the mesh is difficult to use.

this image is with cube projection unwrap and without rescale texture, enter image description here

this image is trying to put the correct size with mapping, you can see that it loose the good projection enter image description here

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I used to do this kind of UV mapping a bit and found 3 methods useful.

  1. UV Project modifier, you can use a camera for each wall angle and the cameras project onto the closest aligned walls. very fast to setup and you can edit your geometry afterwards without having to fix UV's.
  2. Smart UV project, this gives simple projections but has the disadvantage that the bricks on the walls for example, wont line up.
  3. Manually - which can be done quite fast infact - Select a face, Shift+G, Select Similar Normal. Then project from view, or from a Camera if you want to have more control over alignment and quickly re-apply the same projection again can be handy too.

Other things to be aware of...

  • You may want to move the projected UV's for each surface so they dont overlap.
    (just makes it easier to edit and manage). with tiling textures it wont effect the displayed mapping on the mesh.
  • topology may be important to improve, this depends weather you are simply projecting UV's or if you intend to manually edit them (in that case you care more about topology and avoid skinny faces for example).
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The topology of that model fairly poor, and good topology matters especially with UV unwrapping.

You'd probably be better off making the model again, or:

  • Apply a Remesh modifier to automatically "retopologize it", or
  • Retopologize the model with the Shrinkwrap modifier or snapping tools, or
  • Manually cleaning up the mesh by normalizing your edge flow, removing weird edges.

If you still don't get good results, try unwrapping the model manually with Mark Seam and U Unwrap.

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    $\begingroup$ I think you may be over emphasizing the importance of topology, with models with flat surfaces from a cad application its likely Unwrapping isnt ideal anyway (which is better suited to more organic/curved shapes). $\endgroup$ – ideasman42 Sep 29 '13 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ I am of the opinion that good topology is always important. But maybe that's just me (and Jonathan). $\endgroup$ – wchargin Sep 29 '13 at 16:26
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    $\begingroup$ disagree - the need for good topology depends totally on the use case (weather you expect to deform it, or need smooth shading for eg). For architectural models it may not matter much, or at least it may not be worth spending time to change it. $\endgroup$ – ideasman42 Sep 30 '13 at 2:51
  • $\begingroup$ I understand that the topology is important, but when you work on architectural projects, generally, the project is changing every week, and to model and create drawing sheets, it is much easier to work with software cad format that connects more easily . The best way I try is; Manually - which can be done quite fast infact - Select a face, Shift+G, Select Similar Normal. Then project from view, or from a Camera if you want to have more control over alignment and quickly re-apply the same projection again can be handy too. thanks $\endgroup$ – user1358 Sep 30 '13 at 11:19

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