0
$\begingroup$

I'm working on replicating a specific glass effect. I've grasped the concept of extruding the inside of the glass with a gap at the end to achieve the desired outcome. However, I'm facing challenges as the result doesn't quite capture the intended refracted effect.

Are there specific factors I should ensure are in place for success, or could the issue lie in insufficient lighting or modeling techniques?

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Hi. Please use a title that matches the content of the question. It should be descriptive but succinct, unique and identifying, summarizing the issue so that anyone searching for a similar problem is likely to find it. Remove anything superfluous, avoid using words like "this", "help with", "issue" or "question about", instead describe what "it" is. Remember, your title is the first thing potential visitors see, answers you get depend heavily on how insightful it is. See What is the problem of asking “How do I do this?" $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 24 at 21:27
  • $\begingroup$ hi, alright, but i really dont know how to phrase it better $\endgroup$
    – Henry
    Commented Jan 25 at 13:35
  • $\begingroup$ blender.stackexchange.com/questions/86634/… $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 25 at 15:29
  • $\begingroup$ thank you! will check this out $\endgroup$
    – Henry
    Commented Jan 25 at 20:30

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

The look of objects made of glass or other refractive transparent materials depends mostly or even entirely on reflections and refractions. Reflections and refractions depend on the shader as well as surface directions - in other words - the forms of your object. So this means that if you want to make a glass object realistic, you have to copy its form with all its subtleties and small bevels and details matter even more than with opaque objects.

Another thing is the environment, because that's the only thing you see when looking at a transparent object, it's only reflected and refracted. So you need to make sure you have adequate environment around your object.

Lastly, you have to make sure the shader is realistic. Make sure the IOR is correct for your material in the GlassBSDF shader and that's about it, unless you need volume scattering and/or volume absorption as well, but those are pretty self explanatory nodes. If you search for IOR values for glass, you are likely to find that it is 1.5, but that makes no sense actually. There are many many kinds of glass and in reality that is just a random value from a range it can be for different kinds of glass and it could be somewhere in between something around 1.45 and 1.9. It's worth keeping in mind that if you don't get results matching your reference with glass it's OK and still plausible to adjust the IOR in that range. In your case it's likely some sort of plastic, so you should find out what kind of plastic it is and search for correct IOR. I am sure, plastics also have a wide range of plausible values and it is still a good idea to compare your results to reference photos and adjust IOR values accordingly.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ alright, thank you! will look into this. $\endgroup$
    – Henry
    Commented Jan 25 at 20:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .