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I have a quick question. I'm asking just in case so I won't get in trouble further down the line. I'm texturing a model, and it's only for rendering an image of it with some render passes. I'm stacking the UV islands on top of each other, and I'm wondering if that can cause some problems? I am unsure if it might create any issues for me or if it's better to work in a different way? I hope you can provide me with an answer here.

Thanks in advance.

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  • $\begingroup$ As already said in the answer, this should cause no problem if you don't need it for baking. It makes totally sense to overlap UVs, let's say you have an image with a logo, and this should appear multiple times on a certain object. It is a total waste of resources if you want a high resolution logo and need a gigantic image texture just because you need to place the highres logo a dozen times on it so that there is enough space between them to keep the UVs non-overlapping. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 3 at 15:18

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Overlapping UV islands is not a new technique. It has advantages like reducing the overall memory requirement for the scene. If the repetition of the texture is not an issue, this technique should work fine. If you're creating the asset for games, you need to be aware that overlapping UVs are not going to work in light baking. Typically, a second non-overlapping UV map is created for that.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer! It's not for a game, so I won't be baking the texture. I will only render it with render passes :) What is the technique called if I may ask? $\endgroup$
    – N03
    Commented Jan 3 at 10:17
  • $\begingroup$ When you stack UV islands, it creates overlapping UVs. That's the name as far as I know. When you make the UVs in such a way that they never stack, they will be described as non-overlapping UVs. $\endgroup$
    – Mr A
    Commented Jan 3 at 13:24
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much! $\endgroup$
    – N03
    Commented Jan 3 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ You're welcome! $\endgroup$
    – Mr A
    Commented Jan 3 at 17:11

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