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enter image description here

Here is the texture and not rendered as you can see there are fabric textures

enter image description here

Here is rendered then when i rendered the texture is gone i try to do more samples but no difference what possible solution to fix this im a beginner

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    $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome. Please don't write in all caps in the title or body of any posts, it is the written equivalent of shouting, is harder to read and may be considered rude. Please use the edit button below the post to change you text into regular case. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 23, 2023 at 15:40

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You have pretty much answered your own question with your title “DETAILS GONE BECAUSE OF DENOISE” - basically, the denoise pass is intended to smooth out the noise that results from a render with a minimal number of samples - so as to allow you to cut down the total render time. The texture of your fabric is very similar to render sample noise and so the denoiser is simply trying to handle that noise and results in smoothing out the surface.

Your only real option - if you want your final render to include such “noisy” textures - is to disable the denoiser and, instead, render with sufficiently high number of samples.

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  • $\begingroup$ I wouldn't call it the only real option, more like the brute force solution you are sure to be successful if you have enough time to waste. But other solutions exist: OpenImageDenoise usually does a better job at preserving details, higher samples will also allow the denoiser to preserve detail as they get more defined instead of being just noise. Alternatively, you can disable denoising in the render options and instead use the compositor's denoise node, which you can then mix over the original noisy render to have control over the amount of denoising (demo) $\endgroup$
    – Lauloque
    Commented Dec 23, 2023 at 21:54
  • $\begingroup$ @L0Lock Ok - I accept there are other ways to still use some kind of denoise but that is really dependent on the type of noise present and how long you have to tweak settings and get the desired results. From a practical point of view any denoiser will run the risk of removing detail you potentially want to keep - the point is that denoising is not a “silver bullet” that can handle every situation. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 24, 2023 at 8:57

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