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I'm trying to animate this object hitting a wall. I have constrained it to a path. Now I want it to reverse up by following another path. Then zoom off with a third path.

I tried adding multiple follow path constraints to the same object, and keyframe them to follow one after the next, but it goes crazy.

I can't animate along one path as the object flips around when it is supposed to reverse up, and keyframing the position keys gets very complex.

So it seems the easiest way is to delete the path each time but keep the keyframe animation. And gradually build the animation in steps. Is this the right way to go?

If so, how do I bake the animation for each constraint path on a single object without affecting any other animated objects?

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Your suggestion of baking the transformations as keyframes would likely work but I can understand why its not an attractive solution, since making changes to it would be very time consuming. While I'm not sure if this solution would work for your needs I think I've found a workaround that lets you switch the direction of your motion along a curve without needing to keyframe the influences.

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Instead I tried to use the offset keyframes and shape keys to change the curve profile into the next stage of your path you want, switching to it at the moment you need and animating the offset to reverse the direction of travel. Here's an example blend I made https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LmXxBo9pAb2BZ2cee0_iGg1xqalWM9xY/view?usp=sharing

Aside from that my other suggestion would be to have 3 separate objects, one on each curve, that appear and disappear as needed alongside their animations.

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There's already a clever answer, but I think that the easiest way to deal with many curves is to create an empty following each path, then animate a serie of "Child of" constaints to make the character follow the relevant empty.

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