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Ive been using blender for a few years and have never had this problem before. No matter where I move the light, it only shines on the center of the image in render. I have an image with 4 spotlights that in the "viewport shading" view, the lights are fine and in the right spot.enter image description here

But when I go to camera view or render the image, all the lights point at the center.

enter image description here

If I move the lights, they will move but only slightly. I have to move them multiple times farther to see any movement. Its like they are locked on the center.

I even tried opening up a new blender file and pasting the mesh to it and the same problem happens.

I have never had this happen before and Ive looked every where to find a solution. Can someone PLEASE tell me why its doing this?

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    $\begingroup$ Does the problem persist, if you use an orthographic camera to render? $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Sep 10 at 7:35
  • $\begingroup$ can u pls provide a blend file? thx $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 10 at 11:59
  • $\begingroup$ here is the link to the file dropbox.com/scl/fi/zzz2vyn4ejhj229ui2a54/… $\endgroup$ Sep 10 at 15:35

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Your viewport is set to Orthographic, and your camera is Perspective.

Here, we're looking at a sample of the reflected light-rays, ones that happen to be straight up. But the principle applies to the cone of all the others.

In an orthographic view-space, these reflected rays aim directly at the view-plane:

enter image description here

In a perspective view-space, the central rays are still straight to the view-plane, but the rays towards the periphery are lost to it:

enter image description here

.. so the reflected light is more centrally concentrated.

Here's what happens, in a track-and-zoom:

enter image description here

.. as we back off. and zoom in, (approaching an orthographic view), the light from the whole surface is reflected more directly into the camera.

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