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I'm working on a project to create a wave-like effect with pentagon shapes. I am not sure I am doing this the most efficient way, but it almost works.

Except for the Solidify Modifier that does not work as I hoped. When I apply the solidify modifier to the pentagon shapes, the outer bevels/corners become much larger than the inner corners. Messing up the entire animation.

Screenshot one looks good and as desired. Yet when the waves come back up, screenshot 2, you notice the outer corners are much larger, making the wave effect look very weird,

Any ideas on how to solve this?

Screenshot 1 - So far so good

Screenshot 2 - Not as desired

desired effect

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4 Answers 4

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Possible steps, if destructive modelling is acceptable:

enter image description here

  • 5-sided Mesh Circle
  • CtrlShiftB bevel vertices
  • ShiftDS duplicate and scale to centre
  • CtrlE Edge Menu > Bridge Edge Loops
  • CtrlR cut in desired number of slices
  • V split the newly created loops

(ShiftD dupe inner loop, and F fill, if needed)

  • Solidify, and Bevel modifiers, or extrusion and a bevel operation

If you then P separate by loose parts, and set the origin of each ring to a corresponding face with the others, you can assign them all a Shrinkwrap constraint to a mesh which is influenced by a Wave modifier:

enter image description here

With this sort of result:

enter image description here

Wrangling the Wave modifier to loop, if that's what you need, is a bit of a fiddle, fishing for the right numbers. The maths might be a bit easier with a little Geometry Nodes tree, but that's another question?

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  • $\begingroup$ Omg! You're my hero of the week! haha. This is exactly what I'm looking for. I'm gonna give this a go tonight and see if I can recreate this. Thanks again! $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 10:06
  • $\begingroup$ Hi @MarcusMaximus! np. There is a bit of added complexity here to wave-move the rings without deforming the rings themselves. You may not need that. $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 10:10
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That looks like you have the Bevel type set to Percentage instead of Offset. Try these setting instead:

enter image description here

Depending on how big you want the bevel I think you should have a bevel mod before the solidify to bevel the vertices and get smooth corners and then another bevel mod after the solidify, set to only sharp angles so that it only affects the borders That way you can have different widths for the bevels

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately I had the same bevel settings as you, and it didn't change much. Clever idea though to also put a bevel mod before the solidify. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 5:41
  • $\begingroup$ I've added an extra screenshot clarifying the result I'm hoping for. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I think I see the problem. Are you using a 5 sided cylinder with the corners beveled in edit mode, and then a solidify modifier to give it thickness? If so, then it would result in your pic because the solidify mod is basically extruding the faces outwards. The width of the outside corners would not be controllable like that. If that's what you are doing, try using a flat pentagon with a pentagon whole in the middle instead (a 5 sided ring). That should result in the geometry I posted $\endgroup$
    – Cornivius
    Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 12:51
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Here's a type of topology you may be interested in, albeit a little bit more manual. You need to model 1/5 of the pentagon, and then you can duplicate and rotate the mesh 72 degrees 5 times. Merge with AM > By Distance and separate each set of ring faces with P > Separate > By Selection

enter image description here

So you can get something like this:

enter image description here

You can dissolve some of the unneeded Edge Loops. Add 2 Supporting Edge Loop rings on the outer and 2 Supporting Edge Loops rings on the inner sides for support for your Subdivision Modifier:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

With a nicely spaced quad topology, you can do more versatile things like creating smooth deformations, optimizing edge loops for animations, and achieving more predictable shading results:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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i think that is a pretty good use case for geometry nodes. Hopefully geometry nodes is ok for you...

Ok, my solution works as follows:

  1. i create the shape via curves
  2. i "round" it with fillet curve
  3. i create a grid with 2 vertices on one side, and the amount of points of the curves to the other one
  4. in the node group i connect the vertices from the grid from one curve to next curve
  5. then i just extrude the result to have a mesh
  6. i make the result to instances and scale them (if you don't want a rim, don't scale them afterward)

Note: my GN setup is far from being perfect and optimised. I just made it, so that it works.

Node group:

enter image description here

Main:

enter image description here

result:

enter image description here

animated:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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