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After solidifying and applying modifiers on a cloth mesh, I was wondering how it would be possible to sculpt on it using brushes such as inflate given that the opposite face protrudes in the opposite direction. Is there a setting or solution for this? E.g. sculpting ripples in fabric.

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  • $\begingroup$ Maybe the solution is to not use the Inflate brush, not sure you can avoid the problem with this brush $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Commented Jul 24, 2023 at 16:01

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Both planes are applied by using the Solidify modifier on the following screenshot. Then I use the Inflate brush to sculpt: enter image description here

On the following screenshot, on the left plane, the Inflate brush is used without turning on "Front Faces Only", so that you can see the opposite face protrudes in the opposite direction. On the right plane, the Inflate brush is used with turning on "Front Faces Only". The opposite face do not protrude: enter image description here

UPDATE:

Based on the comment written by moonboots, I believe that the surface underneath can rise only if the Solidify modifier has not yet been applied. Please see the screenshot below, where the surface underneath does rise, but the Solidify modifier is still there without being applied. enter image description here

If the Solidify modifier is applied, then perhaps it is not the end of the story, because you still can remedy it. For example, in the Sculpt mode, use the mask brush with turning on "Front Face Only" to draw a mask to completely cover the upper surface of the following mesh, and then select Mask -> Shrink Mask: enter image description here

Then press Ctrl + I to invert the mask. enter image description here By selecting Mask -> Mask Slice, all extra mesh generated by the Solidify modifier is deleted: enter image description here

Now, in the Object mode, use a new Solidify modifier, you may get what you want: enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello, I think his question is how the surface underneath can rise as well (image), which is probably not what's happening here: zupimages.net/up/23/30/tsv2.jpg $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 15:22
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, @moonboots So I just update my answer. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 26, 2023 at 5:28

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