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I want to create this abstract sphere (attached image)enter image description here

I am wonder if it is possible to create it in a fast way. I tried to create a cub and apply subdivision and cast to transform into a sphere, after that I added particles with custom render object (cylinder hexagon), but doesn't look symmetrical... Who can help me... thanks!

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Please use a title that reflects the content of the question. It should be descriptive but succinct, unique and identifying, summarizing the issue so that users can at a glance understand what your post is about. Use the edit link below your post and avoid anything not strictly essential to the post. Remember, your title is the first thing potential visitors will see, and makes your question findable for future users. See "What is the problem with posting an image or link and asking “How do I do this?"" $\endgroup$ May 11, 2023 at 11:33

2 Answers 2

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Start with an Ico Sphere, through the Dual Mesh node and extrude the faces by a random factor:

enter image description here

And here is a slightly more complete example that also creates the distances between the objects, as well as a fully closed geometry:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ But it's not made out of regular hexagons then. There are some pentagons and they are deformed. :D $\endgroup$ May 11, 2023 at 10:50
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    $\begingroup$ @MartynasŽiemys ...we'll take care of that in post-production. :D $\endgroup$
    – quellenform
    May 11, 2023 at 10:53
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    $\begingroup$ That's a good point :D But I think the hexagons being nice and regular in the reference image is part of the whole visual mood. Of course there is this "mathematically impossible" nonsense, but I still think it would be nice if they were regular. $\endgroup$ May 11, 2023 at 11:08
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    $\begingroup$ @quellenform I have made something quite similar, but I thought it would be simpler to just split the edges to have the faces you need for extrusion and flipping... my setup $\endgroup$ May 11, 2023 at 13:00
  • $\begingroup$ Don't have time for an answer now ... GN -> add sphere (or start from one), instance on points using cylinder with 6 sides aligned with the normal, random length and in shading colour based on random index as well. Initial set up is a only a few nodes and anything else is gravy after that to make it look even better. $\endgroup$
    – AJD
    May 11, 2023 at 19:51
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This solution is procedural and only has hexagons. Start with an empty geo nodes object, then add an ico sphere. From there we create and realise instances on both faces and vertexes (but not corners, because that seemed to create issues). After that, we colour, in the same way that Tobias Einarsson did.

Main node line: Main node line for geometry nodes

Create instances: Create instances node group In the above group, we take the geometry (ico sphere because it is a regular shape), convert the mesh twice to points, on the faces and on the vertices. We then join the two sets of points so we can work on them. The next step is to create instances on the points, using a curve line because it is easier to work with. The curve line is aligned with the normal, which was captured as we entered the node group. At the end of this step we have a series of curves.

Realise instances: Realise instances node group In the above group we take the series of curve lines and instance them so we can tailor the individual lines. Firstly we trim the curve so that they are random lengths (using a random value). The amount of trim could be exposed as an input but I have not done this here. The final step here is to convert the curves to a mesh, using a curve circle of resolution 6 (the hexagon) and filling the caps.

Shading nodes: Shading/material nodes

Final result (5 subdivisions): Result

Final result (3 subdivisions): Result with 3 subdivisions

The geo nodes input panel: The procedural part here is setting the original diameter of the ico sphere and the number of subdivisions. What I have not set up as inputs, but could do, is the length of the columns and the minimum length based on randomness. Geo nodes inputs

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  • $\begingroup$ So no pentagons, but presumably there will still be some which only have 5 neighbors instead of 6 (precisely 12 of them in fact), and thus aren't lined up properly? It's mathematically unavoidable of course, and maybe it won't be obvious unless you're specifically looking for it... $\endgroup$ May 12, 2023 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ @DarrelHoffman: feel free to check it for yourself. You could be right - but does it matter? $\endgroup$
    – AJD
    May 12, 2023 at 20:54
  • $\begingroup$ Only the OP can judge if it matters or not. Given that what they're asking for is mathematically impossible, I guess it's up to them to decide whether having a few pentagons or a few misaligned hexagons is preferable. $\endgroup$ May 12, 2023 at 21:22

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