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I have imported a svg where i want to change the roughness so that the object becomes glossy and reflects the objects in front of them. As you can see on the screenshot here the "phone" shape is an imported svg where the roughness is set to zero but it doesnt become glossy/reflective. The cube to the right is in the screenshot is not imported svg and here you can see that the roughness is set to zero and it works, it becomes reflective as you can see.

Does anyone know why this is happening?

Bledner file:

enter image description here

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If I put the phone at about the same place as your cube, here is what I get, it seems to work fine, so it's probably a question of location of your lights and location of your objects which doesn't allow you to see any reflection for the moment:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Ah! Looks like you're right. Weird, i thought it would reflect no matter where the lightning is when the object is so close. But thanks, looks like it works then 😅😄 $\endgroup$ Jan 25, 2023 at 11:41
  • $\begingroup$ your object is not metallic so it won't reflect a lot anyway, maybe put the Specular at 1 if you want more reflection? $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Jan 25, 2023 at 12:06
  • $\begingroup$ @formidableds It's not only a matter of light placement and viewing angle, it is also the color of your reflective material (here the one from moonboots is not white like yours) and the background. See my answer for examples. $\endgroup$ Jan 25, 2023 at 12:49
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It has nothing to do with the SVG. In your scene you have two problems that make the reflection hardly visible: the shiny material is a completely white (non-metallic) surface and you want the shadowed side of the cylinder to be reflected which is mostly lit up by the single-color environment.

white and purple background

The white color of the material itself is a problem because where the sun hits it, it is showing bright white because that's the diffuse color it has - an additional reflection is not visible there. In the shadowed part, a white cylinder could be visible, but since its shadowed side is lit by the purple environment its reflection is hardly distinguishable from the surrounding purple.

It would be different if the sun's light came from the opposite side: the reflective side of the object would be in shadow, which means: not fully bright white - whereas the cylinder's side which will be reflected is lit up and distinguishable from the purple background.

sun on opposite side

Still a fully white reflective non-metallic material makes it hard to see reflections. A different situation is it when you have a black material: with the purple environment the reflection is still quite weak because the cylinder's shadow side has a similar color as the environment:

black material

Which is why I said the other problem in your setup is the uniform colored background. If you would use an HDRI for example (or anything else which gives a more interesting variant background to reflect) the white cylinder becomes much easier distinguishable from the rest of the environment in the reflection:

hdri background

But don't think it is only the HDRI which makes the difference, if you would change the color back to white the reflection will more or less vanish again:

hdri and white material

Now to finish this much too long explanation, I just want to show why I mentioned non-metallic surfaces a few times. A metallic surface is different than a non-metallic (or often called dielectric surface). A metallic surface tints the reflections in the color of the metallic surface. So while the reflection on a black di-electric surface is better visible than on a white one, since it is more like adding light to diffuse color, the color of a metallic surface is multiplied to the reflection or darkening it. Which in case of a black metallic surface means, you cannot see any reflections:

black metallic surface

Instead you have to do it the other way round, the more reflections you want to see the brighter the color of the metallic surface has to be. Which means, if you set it to full white (= reflecting everything in full brightness) with a roughness of 0, you'll get a perfect mirror surface (which you can never achieve with a dielectric material):

mirror surface

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    $\begingroup$ I see! This makes a lot more sense now. Really appreciate this in-depth answer! Thank you 😄 $\endgroup$ Jan 25, 2023 at 15:10
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You simply have to make sure the material is assigned to the object as well as its faces:

enter image description here

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