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How can I make three circles on the face of the following rectangle?

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I am new to Blender and am still trying to figure out how to use all these tools to the fullest.

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    $\begingroup$ Suggest you watch a few videos on modelling! A quick one selected at random here. $\endgroup$
    – John Eason
    Jan 3, 2023 at 11:41
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnEason: but only if you make sound off 🫣 $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jan 3, 2023 at 12:04
  • $\begingroup$ @Chris You don't like the English accent? :^) $\endgroup$
    – John Eason
    Jan 3, 2023 at 12:05
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnEason: uhm...well...in videos like this i am very happy that i can accelerate the youtube speed to 2 .... ;) $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jan 3, 2023 at 12:13

2 Answers 2

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I would do it like this:

Add a curve circle, size and place it as you need it. Double it two times and move it, and then select all circles, Ctrl + J to join. Then select circle, shift-select plane (or your object), tab (edit mode), F3 → knife project.

Delete the circles, select your object, edit mode (tab) → extrude.

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  • $\begingroup$ Very helpful thank you! $\endgroup$
    – DevExodus
    Jan 3, 2023 at 12:24
  • $\begingroup$ you are welcome! $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jan 3, 2023 at 15:38
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Enable LoopTools via menu EditPreferencesAdd-onsLoopTools:

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Model using these steps illustrated in this GIF image and use right-click → LoopToolsCircle to form a circular mesh which you can then extrude.

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Second take with better quad topology and reduced faces. Well, I could have increased the hole radius a bit, but you get the idea.

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    $\begingroup$ @HarryMcKenzie Sure, but for this simple geometry the contemplated "fear of n-gons" by many people is often exaggerated and in this case unnecessary and the n-gons also make a more tidy mesh. $\endgroup$ Jan 3, 2023 at 14:09
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    $\begingroup$ @HarryMcKenzie That depends on what you mean with you "can't apply a subdivision modifier". You can always do that, the question is what you want it to look like and how it then does. Main problem with the Subdivision Surface modifier often is you need supporting cuts to make sure some edges are not rounded too much, and n-gons can't be loop cut which is a problem. But take a mesh primitive object like a cylinder with n-gons as top and bottom faces. Inset those n-gons a bit, make supporting loop cuts around the body and voilà, perfectly smooth subdivision despite the n-gons in the center. $\endgroup$ Jan 7, 2023 at 15:39
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    $\begingroup$ @HarryMcKenzie You know, in the end it all depends on things you might have to consider before you use this or that method - there is no general workflow you can use for each and every project, no matter what the result should be. In this case it's like, do you want to model it easy and quick, how detailed should it be in the end. Is it low poly style or do you need a low poly count? If I for example new beforehand I will have to use a Subdivision Surface modifier on it, I would perhaps model it like that and still have less polygons then the screenshot above, but very smooth edges: $\endgroup$ Jan 7, 2023 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ Not enough space here for long comments... but actually is this site not to encourage people to chat in the comments anyway. So here is the link to my solution for smoothed edges, left side the mesh, right side the smoothed version: traffic lights. Still lots of n-gons, but no problem. $\endgroup$ Jan 7, 2023 at 16:35
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    $\begingroup$ @GordonBrinkmann hey thank you so much for your input and enlightening me! highly appreciate the time and effort to share your wisdom Gordon :) $\endgroup$ Jan 8, 2023 at 12:31

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