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Recently, I've been attempting to replicate the shaders used in a Unity game within blender, and have recently stumbled into a new realization regarding how it handles emissive materials.

Essentially, the color used by the material is an HDR color. In Unity, these can be used to make colors emit from an object.

enter image description here (how the color is set up in unity. Also, the RGB 0-1 values used for the colors contain numbers greater than 1 [In this case, G is set to 1.600119 and B is set to 3.433962] and are somehow averaged out to create another number for Intensity. I wish I could view the shader code to find out more, but I don't know how to.)

Depending on the lighting, the material color will brighten significantly:

enter image description here

I have been attempting to achieve this in Eevee (as well as a tiny bit of experimentation in Cycles) but can not get emissive Principled BSDF materials to behave like this. Is there a way to make this work as intended, or am i just completely out of luck?

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2 Answers 2

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Maybe this direction can suit your needs.

Principled Bsdf has a PBR approach, it tries to balance between diffuse, glossy, emission, and others to remain phisically plausible.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ While it did work for the color I presented, it unfortunately didn't seem to work for other colors I put into it. i.imgur.com/U3OBZgO.png I wish I understood how it worked, but as the Unity shader isn't a one I made, I do not know how to look further into it myself. $\endgroup$
    – SSM0770
    Dec 13, 2022 at 20:07
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Here is just a slightly upgraded version of Josh's answer. The "second" color is achieved by coloring the Glossy node in relation to the primary color. To make it compatible with multiple colors, I used a Hue/Saturation node to automatically pick the alt color (based on the primary - the alt color is what the primary color would be with the emission value cranked to 10 or so, so a "brighter" version of the same color, so to speak. Increase the Value of the Hue/Saturation to make it brighter and more "different" - 5 or so matches your example image better but doesn't work as well with all colors).

I spliced together 3 "Scenarios" in the image below (left to right):

  1. No world lighting, no point light within affective distance
  2. No world lighting, point light up close
  3. Max world lighting, no point light within affective distance

Glow

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