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I'm trying to make icing around the top and base of a cake, and the only way I've found this can be done is to make a star, extend it and loop cut it into segments, then use simple deform to twist it 360 degrees and then use curve modifyer with a circle curve and alter the length of the star tube until it forms a complete circle, as shown below. enter image description here

enter image description here

but using this technique leaves a weird shading line where the two ends meet. Ideally, I'd like to use a circle curve and make the fill of the line the twisted star but I am unsure of how to execute this. I can so far only make a cicrle with a star shape as the line fill but with no twist, like this:

enter image description here

adding the modifier "simple deform" under "twist" to this circle creates a gross messes of a shapes, below: enter image description here

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Use the weld modifier to merge the overlapping vertices. This way the normals will be interpolated and the seam hidden.

Modifier Stack

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  • $\begingroup$ I was going to suggest the Weld modifier as well, that's definitely the correct answer - but a stupid question: in your screenshot I see you have selected Circle.003 and the modifier is at default Distance of 0.001, but with this setting the vertices are not welded in my Blender - there's too much overlap between both ends. I have to set the value as high as 0.055 to weld the complete seam, and then much more vertices along the object get merged earlier. How did you do that? I used the Weld modifier on Circle.005, there a Distance of 0.012 is sufficient. $\endgroup$ Dec 8, 2022 at 12:30
  • $\begingroup$ Or did you scale the mesh in Edit Mode to decrease the overlap? I had to scale it down by 0.9961 to make it work with a distance of 0.001 - if you did that, it's probably best to mention that in your answer or otherwise tr4sha might say the solution didn't work for her. $\endgroup$ Dec 8, 2022 at 12:32
  • $\begingroup$ I scaled the curve. Feel free to suggest an edit. =) $\endgroup$
    – Mia
    Dec 12, 2022 at 11:17

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