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I'm trying to make a wet concrete texture and for the roughness map, I am using a Noise and Musgrave texture. I got something that I really like, however whenever I try to scale up the plane the whole roughness map scales up with it meaning if I wanted to do a scene with a big wet concrete lot I would have to manually make a new roughness map.6M plane vs 60M plane It might be hard to see in the image, but the one on the left is the 6 m plane, and the one on the right is the 60 m plane that I had to zoom out to see, as you can see they have the same texture. Does anyone know how to make it so that when I scale the plane up the texture gets procedurally generated?

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  • $\begingroup$ If I understood your question correctly, take a look at my answer. Because the answer you accepted will only work if you don't intend to move the camera. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 2, 2022 at 8:31

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Your goal can be done by plugging the Camera parameter of the texture coordinate into the vector of your musgrave texture (or, in your case, the prior mapping node)

:)

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  • $\begingroup$ But as soon as he moves the camera further away, the texture size will change as well... even worse: each movement of the camera makes the texture move around on the plane. @Eric Are you sure this does what you want - because you accepted the answer? $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 2, 2022 at 8:27
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If you want the scale of the texture to be independent from the size of the plane, you can use the Object output of the Texture Coordinate node. The important thing is to scale the plane either in Edit Mode or - when scaling in Object Mode - to apply the scale afterwards with Ctrl+A > Scale. This way it doesn't matter how large the plane is.

object mapping

Another advantage is: you can define a different object as origin of the Texture Coordinate, for example an Empty.

If you leave the Object field at the bottom of the node empty, the Texture Coordinate's center is at the origin of the object that uses the material. In this case, placing two planes apart from each other will result in both having the same texture as you can see on the left. But if you choose another object as origin, than the texture will stay in the same place even when moving the plane. Which means, if the planes are overlapping somewhere or are placed next to each other, you will get a continous, seamless texture mapped over both objects as you can see on the right.

seamless textures

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