3
$\begingroup$

I'm trying to use the solidify modifier to extrude a vertex group like the image below

extrude example

But when I try the result is a sloped, rather than a rimmed

result

One of the causes could be the weight painting for the vertex group is a gradient.

weight map

Is there any way to get a slope rather than a rim?

Edit:

I have found Geometry Nodes can be used to get 90% of what I want. The following is a simple Geometry Node setup which will do an extrude without a slope:

enter image description here

Seems to work well with more complex shapes.

enter image description here

It's possible to have multiple vertex groups on the same object with different heights.

enter image description here

There still are some problems:

I don't know how to keep a face out of the vertex group if all the faces surounding it are part of the vertex group.

enter image description here

Vexrtices which are part of two vertex groups with different heights behave strangely

enter image description here

Any help on the above two problems would be great.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ hello, what is your final goal? You can't achieve that, unless you create a very thin inset $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Nov 14, 2022 at 7:55
  • $\begingroup$ it is a bit unfair to ask for extrusion with solidify modifier and then changing the question to ask about geometry nodes. So it would be very nice from you if you accept moonboots right answer to your question and open a new question regarding the same problem but with another title like "how can i extrude with gn...". Thx. You can just copy/paste the question to a new question, takes 2 mins. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Nov 17, 2022 at 11:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Chris now that I know more about Geometry Nodes and the Solidify Modifier I realize that my question is not really helpful. The reason why I didn't accept moonboots' answer is that inseting the vertex group still creates a slight slope. If I came across this question via google it would send me in the wrong direction. I do realize that this is unfair to moonboots. Would it be better to delete this question and ask a new question? $\endgroup$ Nov 17, 2022 at 23:09
  • $\begingroup$ @user1239299: i just would accept moonboots answer because AFAIK it is the right answer. Sometimes the answer is: Blender cannot do it that way. But there might be other ways like geometry nodes. I cannot tell you what to do - that's up to you - but if i were you i would accept this answer and open a new question with another title so that it is clear that you wanna have a GN solution (or even maybe another) $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Nov 18, 2022 at 6:41

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

You can't achieve that with Solidify, there will always be a slope between the vertices, but if you inset these faces...

enter image description here

you'll have something almost good:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
5
  • $\begingroup$ Is it possible to get the same effect without creating additional geometry? $\endgroup$ Nov 16, 2022 at 3:45
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Could you please tell what is your final goal, why you need to use the Solidify modifier in your situation? It would help to find a solution $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Nov 16, 2022 at 6:49
  • $\begingroup$ I am trying achieve a solidify effect on vertex groups without creating additional geometry $\endgroup$ Nov 17, 2022 at 3:32
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Sure, but for example why don't you do it manually with an extrusion? $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Nov 17, 2022 at 9:27
  • $\begingroup$ I know I'm going to have to change the mesh in the future possibly many times $\endgroup$ Nov 17, 2022 at 10:00

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .