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I'm trying to recreated the Tea Strainer in the screenshot below. I'm struggling to find a way to create the uniform perforations (little holes). I have followed a tut where they are offset but they need to be uniform where the vertices intersect. enter image description here

Does anyone have a recommendation for an easy fix?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

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Before subdivision, select all vertices there you want to spawn points:

enter image description here

Press Ctrl + B, V and press LMB. Adjust last operation F9:

enter image description here

Select one circle and press Shift + G -> area

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Press adjust last operation F9 and low down the threshold to get only circles selected:

enter image description here

Remove them and add solidify modifier

enter image description here

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Another possible method, create holes in the middle of faces. For this version it's best to have the addon LoopTools enabled which comes with Blender.

  1. Select the faces where you want the holes to be.

select faces

  1. Press I twice to inset individual faces (if they all inset in one big face because this option was enabled already, press I again to toggle to individual).

inset faces

  1. Next, right-click in the viewport and from the context menu select Subdivide. Leave it at the default 1 cut to avoid creating to much geometry for tiny holes.

sudivide

  1. After subdividing, right-click again in the viewport and now choose LoopTools > Circle.

circle

  1. Now the faces are rounded and already selected. Hit X > Delete > Faces and you're finished.

delete faces

The disadvantage of this method versus the beveled vertices in the answer by @Crantisz is that the holes are getting smaller from top to bottom - because the decreasing size of the faces. If necessary, you could counter that manually by adjusting them per row which of course is annoying.

The advantage of the inset faces is the selection to delete them is much easier and if you want the object to be shaded smooth, the result of this method looks much better than the one with the beveled vertices. In the image below you see a comparison between beveled vertices method on the left and inset faces method on the right. Notice how the shading to the sides looks.

shading comparison

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  • $\begingroup$ Thankyou both for your very helpful answers. Is there a way of using the first method but avoiding the shading artefacts? (which are quite visible on a shiny metallic object) $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 10, 2022 at 16:33
  • $\begingroup$ @RossingtonSteele I tried a bit but couldn't get it much better. I guess there is a way, maybe ask Crantisz in a comment below his answer, I don't know if he's reading this here. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 10, 2022 at 16:36

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