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there is a nice sticky mesh experiment made by Alex Martinelli on twitter (check the video). Any tips on how building something similar ?

enter image description here

Thanks !

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  • $\begingroup$ To me it looks like he is moving two spheres here, and moving their points with transfer attributes to the nearest point of the other mesh. After that, he just randomly distributes points (volumes?) on the surface. Just a guess. Try it. $\endgroup$
    – quellenform
    Sep 18, 2022 at 10:03
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    $\begingroup$ A few days ago I saw something similar here (tutorial about sticky vines) $\endgroup$
    – Blunder
    Sep 18, 2022 at 10:13

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As mentioned in the comment, it looks to me as if a sphere is simply moved and its points are aligned to the nearest object.

However, to create the desired effect, a volume is apparently used here.

enter image description here

There are, of course, several ways to create this, but to me, turning the mesh into curves, and those curves into points, seemed the most obvious solution.

Of course you could also create the points on the surface with Distribute Points on Faces, but I think that in this example directly the edges were converted to points.

In any case, the following example could be a solution for you, with which you could approach the desired result step by step:

enter image description here


(Blender 3.2+)

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  • $\begingroup$ That is sick. Thanks ! $\endgroup$
    – gordie
    Oct 10, 2022 at 12:17
  • $\begingroup$ So your initial cube isn't used there. Why do you start with an Ico sphere, and why does it needs to be converted to curves ? Thanks ! $\endgroup$
    – gordie
    Oct 10, 2022 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ @gordie You are welcome! And yes, that's correct: The geometry in this setup is created exclusively with Geometry Nodes, and the cube no longer plays any role at all here. $\endgroup$
    – quellenform
    Oct 10, 2022 at 12:56
  • $\begingroup$ @gordie You can of course use any shape for it instead of the Ico Sphere. For me, it just looked in your example as if a sphere would be used here. The node Mesh to Curve is also not mandatory here. It was the closest I could get to the example you showed, because it creates the points for the volume along the edges, rather than at random positions on the surface. It takes a bit of trial and error here, and it just depends on what exactly you want your result to look like. But the technique itself is a good starting point, I think. $\endgroup$
    – quellenform
    Oct 10, 2022 at 12:56

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