0
$\begingroup$

I'm using Cycles in Blender 3.2. I'm importing a JPG via Image As Plane. It is either too bright using an Emission Shader or muted as Principled BSDF default import settings. Help?

Original screen shot from Photoshop

Blender screen shot with settings Rendered image

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Oh yeah, I've got sRGB Filmic color settings as well. My image is sRGB color settings. $\endgroup$
    – Andy
    Aug 30, 2022 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

2
$\begingroup$

Principled BSDF is a shader. It has shading that depends on lighting, it also has specular reflection component that changes how it looks based on environment and angle of view, it receives shadows from other objects - obviously it is not supposed to look same as the image alone. So the first thing to do would be to use emission shader.

There is also a problem of color management. What you will still see with emission shader is Filmic view transform applied to the image. The colors will look different because filmic colors are supposed to look different, but also 8 bit per channel image does not have enough information for this process and detail will be lost it. If you want the rendered result to look same as sRGB image, you should not use Filmic, but sRGB view transform which is for some reason called "Standard" in Blender:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
5
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Martynas. Thanks for your reply. I tried exactly what you said and it looks exactly the same through the viewport and rendered. See the results and settings here...andydeanphotography.smugmug.com/Blender-Image-Files-8312022/… $\endgroup$
    – Andy
    Aug 31, 2022 at 18:05
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Principled BSDF is a shader. It has shading that depends on lighting, it also has specular reflection component that changes how it looks based on environment and angle of view, it receives shadows form other objects - obviously it is not supposed to look same as the image alone. What exactly are your expectations here? And what are you trying to achieve? $\endgroup$ Aug 31, 2022 at 18:53
  • $\begingroup$ Okay. Thank you!!!! That's the ticket!!! It's making more sense now. I got a suggestion from a YouTuber (youtube.com/c/WenboZhao - very cool guy) that said "Go to shading tab, using an emissions shader with the images texture instead" so THAT combined with what you suggested, using sRGB and not Filmic, seems to be the solution to my issue. I am trying to create short videos using photography as the background. That combo worked...andydeanphotography.smugmug.com/Blender-Image-Files-8312022/… THANK YOU Martynas. Let me know if this combo is what you mean? $\endgroup$
    – Andy
    Aug 31, 2022 at 20:06
  • $\begingroup$ Hi @MartynasŽiemys, I thinkit would be worth it to edit your answer to add what you added as comment to make it more whole. $\endgroup$
    – L0Lock
    Aug 4, 2023 at 20:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Hi, @L0Lock. I tried to improve it a bit. $\endgroup$ Aug 4, 2023 at 20:43
-2
$\begingroup$

I was facing the same problem. What worked for me is the solution from this video on YouTube. When you import the image and select "Emission", it appears on the right side in the file browser. Then the image is imported as such and has exactly the same sharpness as the original, but it doesn't react to light. You could also choose Principled BSDF, then you can light the image as you want and create a scene.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This does not solve the issue of 8 bit image conversion to linear color space and then applying filmic color transform to it. There is not enough information in the 8 bit per channel image for this to work nicely. As you can see, the question has a screenshot showing emission node being used. $\endgroup$ Aug 4, 2023 at 19:43

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .