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I want to recreate a Rocket Launch and have the problem, that the smoke behaviour looks very different from Real Rocket Launches.

I put a Mantaflow Fire/Smoke emitter and Force Field in every engine. The emitters have an initial velocity of -200m/s in the z-axis and the wind force fields are set to 10 (Tried it also with 50). The engines have a collision so that the wind should be only pushing down the smoke from the engines. But I'm still far aways from an original recording. For one, I would need at least 10 times as much smoke. Is there any way I can increase the amount without changing the emitter size? It still has to stay in the engine. And even though I've shielded the wind now, it still seems like the smoke is being pushed down like that. What can I do there? I would be really grateful for any help :)

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure if I understand correctly what you've done to make the wind work... what do you mean by saying "The engines have a collision so that the wind should be only pushing down the smoke from the engines"? What part of the engines has a collision? Did you enable Absorption in the force field settings? Have you set Field Absorption to 1 on the collision objects? $\endgroup$ Aug 17, 2022 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ You should maybe ask another question for the wind where you also explain it a bit further. This site is designed to answer one specific problem in one question, since if someone would give another answer for the wind problem, you could only mark one of them as "Accepted", even if both would be the correct solutions on their respective subjects. $\endgroup$ Aug 17, 2022 at 14:15

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Smoke simulations are a very complex thing and there are many settings which could yield very different results. So, it's not so easy to answer a question like how to make it look like the real thing? It depends a lot on your model, its size, its geometry, all the smoke relevant settings etc. And since you'll never manage to simulate it with all values reflecting what is really happening there it mostly comes down to what looks good. The best way to get good smoke simulations is to maybe watch some tutorials to get a sense for what the settings do and playing around a lot just to get experience. That's nothing we can provide in an answer on this site.

However, for the question on how to get more smoke: the magic word in fluid simulations is resolution. Since the original rocket is quite large, you have to set higher Resolution Divisions in the domain to make it appear like more large scale smoke.

Of course this costs more time to bake and to render in the end. Apart from a higher resolution there are a few other settings which you can try to make the smoke look like more. For example, a simple thing is the Density in the smoke material. Then there is another density value in the flow object's settings. The slider is by default on 1 and cannot be moved to increase it, but you can type in higher values. If your engine meshes have a volume, you can try Volume Emission up to a value of 1 (default is 0, the mesh emits smoke only on the surface). If you instead use a particle system as flow source, you can increase the number of particles and in the flow object settings change the particles' Size.

To explain this all would be a lot to read, so I'll just add an overview where different settings are changed:

smoke comparison

And these are the locations of the settings I'm varying in the above image. Of course you can change more settings at once, just keep in mind most of it all results in increasing baking and rendering times.

smoke settings

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your answer! That has already helped a little. I've already searched for tutorials, but unfortunately didn't find anything where the smoke goes to the sides, which is my biggest problem :/ $\endgroup$ Aug 17, 2022 at 15:25

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