2
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to make this topology into a square without twisting, rotating the vertices to get a perfect square? I know my mesh because of the circle in the middle has gone into a circular topology, but some parts I need them to be rectangle shape. So if there's an easier method I'd like to know, thanks.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
0

4 Answers 4

3
$\begingroup$

You have such topology just a bit outter :)

enter image description here

So you can delete few unnecessary loops and reposition the square. Straighten with S, x or Y, zero if needed (as already mentioned).

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

If at all possible, I would work the other way round, without the circular topo.. It's easier to make a square region circular, than to make a quarter-circle square.

enter image description here

  • Grid
  • Inset squares (you could make them bigger first, if wanted)
  • Scale out a region to accommodate a circle
  • Shipped add-on: Loop Tools > Circle the inner region, and inset the circle.

If you needed supporting loops for extrusion and subdivision, or other hand work, you could work under a Mirror in X and Y

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

First rotate your whole geometry by 45°: enter image description here

Then scale the side edges by 0 along y and x accordingly to straighten them up: enter image description here

Finally rotate the whole geometry back: enter image description here

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

You can do this with custom transform orientations.

Select one of the edges pointing towards the circle's center. Above the viewport (a dropdown that says "Global") add a new orientation with a "+" button. The Y axis is now pointed along the selected edge. So now select the edges you want to be perpendicular to it, and flatten them along the new orientation's Y (press S, then Y, then 0, then Enter).

Now that you've flattened the perpendicular sides, you can use them as a second new transform orientation. So again click "+", and now flatten the other two sides along the new Y.

If you want a perfect square, you can do a two-segment vertex bevel, but you'll need right angles between edges at the vertex. enter image description here

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Wow, all great solutions, which one can I really mark as correct. They all worked well to solve my problem. $\endgroup$ Jul 29, 2022 at 1:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .