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I have this LEGO® head which I've exported from LeoCAD to a Collada (.dae) file and imported into Blender:

minifig-head

Right-clicking on the selected minifig head and converting it to Greasepencil results in this ugly thing:

minifig-head, but in Greasepencil

Apparently, Blender traced all the primitives, of which there are a lot. Is there a way to avoid that? Perhaps I could optimise my the 3D object before converting it to Greasepencil, or is it a setting within Greasepencil that I must change (e.g. making it less touchy and drawing out only what it judges is an edge)?

The same phenomenon also occurs with perfectly flat objects, such as this EV3 P-Brick, also converted from LDR to DAE and imported into Blender, using the same technique:

p-brick

Converted to Greasepencil:

p-brick, but in Greasepencil

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  • $\begingroup$ I’m not sure how the grease pencil converter works yet, but as suggested about “optimizing the mesh,” try Edit Mode, Select All, Merge (By distance) first. $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    Jul 23, 2022 at 0:06
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    $\begingroup$ @TheLabCat Thank you. When I do what you say, I get a little message in the bottom of the screen saying "Removed 0 vertice(s)". Attempting to convert to Greasepencil again results in a very similar, if not identical result as before. $\endgroup$
    – GPWR
    Jul 23, 2022 at 0:35
  • $\begingroup$ Okay. Try Del -> Limited Dissolve? $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    Jul 23, 2022 at 0:44
  • $\begingroup$ @TheLabCat Thank you again for your response. Here's the result: mediafire.com/convkey/f69f/wylmf4hlvhuftom9g.jpg I lose the face of the minifig head by doing "Del -> Limited Disolve", though the Greasepencil conversion is no "as" bad. I'm still pretty far from getting a clear image, though. $\endgroup$
    – GPWR
    Jul 24, 2022 at 1:03

1 Answer 1

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I think you misunderstand the grease pencil conversion. The operator takes all edges in the mesh, and turns them into stroke lines, and all vertices into stroke points. It does not turn the mesh into a 2D representation of itself, or even a 3D representation that will look like a 2D from any angle. For that, use Freestyle, or toon shaders. Note than only shaders can respond to different colors in an image texture, but the others can respond to different materials, as could be used in this model because it is made up of a few solid colors.

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    $\begingroup$ Oh, I see. So, to make it even clearer than it already is, it would be impossible to draw a sphere which actually looks like a sphere from every angle in Greasepencil, but only a 2D circle within a 3D coordinate system(?) $\endgroup$
    – GPWR
    Jul 25, 2022 at 14:18
  • $\begingroup$ @GPWR Correct. I recommend learning about Freestyle. It’s pretty flexible, TYJ. $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    Jul 25, 2022 at 14:34
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you so much. I will invest time into learning it for sure. A quick lookup in the Blender manual and Google search reveals just the look I've been looking for. God bless you. $\endgroup$
    – GPWR
    Jul 25, 2022 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ @GPWR I receive that, you too! $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    Jul 25, 2022 at 15:21

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