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I want to grid the mesh circle like the image in geometry nodes.

Highlitghted circle in the image

This is what I already have done: What I have already done

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3 Answers 3

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You can use the Cone node and then delete it's sides:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ This was useful but now it created a lot of triangles connected to a point in the middle. Do you know how to fix? imgur.com/a/ZNKBan5 $\endgroup$ Jul 18, 2022 at 0:00
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    $\begingroup$ @RenatoRubensSousadosSantos If you don't want to have triangles, just switch the Fill Type to "N-Gon". $\endgroup$
    – quellenform
    Jul 19, 2022 at 8:15
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This is maybe a bit OTT for this one, but it's something I've been working on anyway..

Here's a Grid Fill GN group.

The illustrations may be a bit big to be useful.. but I'll try to summarize the method:

enter image description here

The job of the above sub-group is 1: to return the indices at the ends of rows and columns for each point in a given grid: e.g. (3,45) in X, (14,20) in Y, for point 17, below. 2: to associate each point in the perimeter with numbers in a continuous loop:

enter image description here

That group is used in a 'Basic Grid Fill':

enter image description here

.. which sends the perimeter of the grid to the target edge-loop, using the indices generated by (2, above), and interpolates the locations of the inner vertices between the new locations of their row and column ends. (1, above) .

The final Grid Fill group adds an interface, exposing an 'Offset', which rotates the grid with respect to the target loop, and 'Span Bias', which allows you to select any of the ratios of X and Y in the grid, having the right number of vertices in its perimeter.

enter image description here

This shows those parameters being adjusted

enter image description here

Further work could be done making the sigmoid bias in interpolation (currently provided by Map Range 's 'Smooth Step') more controllable. I doubt very much it's unbreakable; if anyone wants to use it, and breaks it, please leave a comment.

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    $\begingroup$ I would like to understand this. I am beginner at geometry nodes. $\endgroup$ Jul 20, 2022 at 13:34
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just create a mesh circle with 4 vertices, then subdivide:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Note: you might want to adapt the radius a bit ;)

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