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I made a procedural pattern (photo 1) it works perfect on a cube but when i try to get it om my model it gives strange lines (photo 2). What did i do wrong? photo 1

photo 2

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  • $\begingroup$ Nothing :) Procedural textures are 3Dimensional ... in your case you would have to use 2D texture (image) and use UVmap Texture Coordinates. $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Jun 7, 2022 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

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The checker pattern is still there, but only in 2D- It's being "projected" from the top, as if it had depth. An alternative would be using UV texture coordinates from a properly unwrapped UV sphere.

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A Brick texture is a more convoluted form of a checker texture.

The checker texture works in a simple way:

  1. It's black (Color 2) in 0 dimensions.
  2. In one dimension, it alternates: first it's black for some length $a$, then it's white (Color 1) for same offset $a$, then it's black again...
  3. In two dimensions, on one axis it alternates exactly as in p. 1. However, it's true only for the distance $a$ on Y axis, and then rather than starting with black, it starts with white. Then after another offset $a$ on the Y axis, it goes back to be like in p. 1... You can think of it, as every 2nd row being inverted.
  4. In three dimensions the logic continues: on height $a$ on the Z axis the textures is like in p. 2. Then on the next level for another $a$ distance on the Z axis the colors are flipped.

Here's how the checker texture can be implemented without using the Checker Texture node:

Keep in mind you could keep adding those ÷2 reminders to support 4 and more dimensions. For example, if you use a #frame driver, to treat time as a dimension:

To clear your confusion on why the checker texture looks weird on a sphere, try pressing Numpad digits, or clicking on navigation gizmo to switch to an orthographic view:

Now from this perspective the texture looks almost correct:

The reason for this is that now your perspective is almost 2-dimensional - still the surface of the sphere is not at constant X - and the circles between flipped colors denote where the X coordinate of the surface moves past another $a$ offset. You could multiply the X coordinate by 0, to disregard it:

And as already pointed out by vklidu and SleepyEngi, if your object is UV unwrapped, rather than using (implied) Generated coordinate, you can use the UV coordinate:

In case of a sphere, using polar coordinates will give you a similar effect:

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot now I understand better what I am doing :) I just starting with blender I wil try to make this with UV textures. $\endgroup$
    – aleks
    Jun 7, 2022 at 15:15

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