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How to avoid warp when rotating line.

I have an object that I'm trying to reproduce on the left (do to non-parallel lines and uneven vertices)

See image on the left below img1

I tried recreating the object by using the following steps:

  1. Duplicate the top curved mesh line
  2. Then extrude down
  3. Rotate the bottom mesh curved line. (the object becomes warped see arrows on right)

See image on right

img2

I'm trying to recreate the object on the left but without the non-parallel lines and uneven vertices.

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2 Answers 2

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Don't use rotation. Instead, go to an appropriate, orthogonal view, and then use a shear operation on the bottom vertices:

enter image description here

With a shear tool, you click and drag in that box, and it does a shear operation. I'm afraid I don't know how to explain a shear operation in plain English, except that it's not rotation, and it does what you want:

enter image description here

While there is an explicit "shear" from the searchbar, it doesn't work in an ortho view, and this happens to be the one and only operation that I use the toolbar for (otherwise, it stays in cursor tool for easy lasso select and cursor placement.)

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Instead of rotating the bottom faces, simply select the corner vertices and move them down on the Z-axis. You can do this on each of the vertices to get them an even slope.

Edit: Go into X Ray mode, and select on group of vertices on the corner. Enable proportional editing and drag it down, you can scroll the middle mouse button to change the size of the influence.

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  • $\begingroup$ So your saying to move the vertices separately? Wouldn't that possibly add unevenness (I'm trying to avoid that). $\endgroup$
    – Rick T
    Jun 3, 2022 at 21:39
  • $\begingroup$ No go to X Ray mode> Box select one group of vertices and drag them down on the Z axis with proportional editing enabled... I will edit my answer $\endgroup$ Jun 3, 2022 at 21:41

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