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I want to model something lowpoly (papercraft) similar to this:

enter image description here

This is obviously mirrored, but has faces bridged over the mirror border instead of a center seam.

The only thing I could come up with was switching of clipping and merging and modeling with "gaps" in the middle and later bridge them when I'm done, but honestly, this stretches my imagination a bit. Checking merge doesn't help because it projects the vertex to the mirror-plane when in range, changing the intended geometry.

Is there a way to make the mirror modifier bridge from modeled edge-loop to mirrored edge-loop over the mirror-plane, or more generally, how would you approach this?

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  • $\begingroup$ to add to Pierre Ducos' answer, anyway you can use the Mirror modifier or the Symmetry operation, then dissolve the central edge $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Jun 2, 2022 at 6:43

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Edit Mode: "Mesh Symmetry"

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Rather than using Blender's "Mirror Modifier", you can opt to use blender's built-in "Mesh Symmetry" modes, which can be enabled by selecting your "Symmetry Axis" to the right of the butterfly icon.

This will not work for non-symmetrical meshes, and cannot be used to create new geometry (i.e., you cannot extrude with symmetry, but you can grab with symmetry.

Recommended Workflow

I recommend that you create mirrored base-mesh, via the mirror modifier. Once your basemesh is complete, apply the mirror modifier, and dissolve the center edge loop. Finally, if you find it necessary, you can tweak your mesh using the "Mesh Symmetry" options.

Let's try this together:

enter image description here

Let's make a cube, deleting half of it so that we can add a mirror modifier to it.

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Let's create edge loops surrounding the face, to prepare for the eyes, ears, and mouth.

Inset the selected faces to create the eyes, ears, and mouth. (Join the mouth to the centerline, for a proper face. Here I have removed the geometry which was skewed from the inset.)

enter image description here

Add as much geometry as you think you will need, and apply your mirror modifier! (You must be in object mode to apply your mirror modifier.) Return to edit mode, and change your geometry using the "Mesh Symmetry" settings!

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Here was my end result, which looks more like a helmet than a head:

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In conclusion

In the end, I find this to be a total pain! I would recommend low-poly retopology over a sculpted mesh, or traditional base-mesh modeling. However, if it works, it works! Let me know how I can help you.

Good luck! Happy blending!

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  • $\begingroup$ Let me know if you want to know what "Retopology" or "Base Mesh Modeling" are! I would be happy to help. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2022 at 0:41

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