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I am new to Blender and I know some basics. I am to create a pointy/arrow ring to print out, like this one.

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

I am trying to understand how I am to create it. I have tried:

  • making two simple rings with torus mesh, but I have no idea how to make it pointy and bent and then connect the rings at the bottom.
  • starting with a cylinder and sculpt mode to try to "dig the rings out". Also tried cutting it out with pyramids for the pointy shape, doesn't work.

Any ideas on how to get started? Start from a torus and distort it in some way or dig it out from a cylinder or other shape?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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I would suggest to start with a simple subdivideb plane and a bezier curve. Add to the plane a curve modifier pointing at the Bezier curve, a mirror, a solidify and a subdivision surface.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice :). Would you mind adding a screenshot of the curve shape? Just can't wrap my head around it :)) $\endgroup$ Commented May 2, 2022 at 17:06
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry Jachym, I deleted it, but it's that orangy thin line you can see in my screenshot, starting from the origin and ending on the center of the top line. $\endgroup$ Commented May 3, 2022 at 6:18
  • $\begingroup$ oh thanks for the explanation, now i get it :) really brilliant. $\endgroup$ Commented May 3, 2022 at 9:05
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So first, I modeled the main shape of the body. That's probably the most important thing when modeling complex objects like this. Try to break it down into the most simple 3D shapes and go from there, rather than building it poly-by-poly.

enter image description here

Then I use solidify modifier, to give it thickness.

enter image description here

Then I use boolean modifier to subract out the middle part. This is helpful for two reasons, 1) It allows you to procedurally modifiy the shape really quickly, theres not alot of fiddling with verts, which makes the shape cleaner in the long run. 2) I think it helps you get closer to achieving the shape in the same way the person who actually made the object would have probably done it.

Most complex objects (at least before 3d printing) were made by starting from a rod or cube shape blank of steel, wood, plastic or whatever and then a craftsman would drill, scrape, carve or machine away the parts they didn't want to get the final product. This method emulates this methodology in 3d.

enter image description here

Then once I get the shape I'm happy with, duplicate it, Apply the modifiers, and do a little bit of cleanup (honestly I probably went further than was necessary here), mainly just needed to get this giant N-gon sorted out.

enter image description here

That's pretty easy to do with these 3 steps:

enter image description here

You might have to do a bit more work on the bottom section but this is the only part thats a must-do for the next section.

Then in order to skip having to deal with adding control loops in manually, I can just mark the edges I want with a bevel weight of 1, then add a Bevel modifier with 2 segments, profile set to 1 (basically only adding the edge loops) clamp overlap off, Limit Method as weight, to only affect the edges we want. enter image description here

Then add a SubSurf mod and presto.

enter image description here enter image description here

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