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How can I round out the tip of this cone to make it look like an airplane nose?

screenshot

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    $\begingroup$ What approaches have you tried so far? I would suggest you take a look at proportional editing. $\endgroup$
    – Robert Gützkow
    Apr 21, 2022 at 9:02
  • $\begingroup$ Using Subdivision Surface modifier for specific Vertex Group? $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Apr 21, 2022 at 9:03
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    $\begingroup$ You could also try with a sphere and work back from that $\endgroup$
    – graphikeye
    Apr 21, 2022 at 9:19
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    $\begingroup$ Collapse the outermost vertex. Extrude the flat circular face left. Scale it down a little bit. Bevel it with several segments to get your rounded nose. $\endgroup$
    – Gunslinger
    Apr 21, 2022 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

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Just to illustrate how to use proportional editing here.

  1. Add more loopcuts
  2. Move the tip inwards
  3. Check Proportional editing > Sharp and adjust

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ ? Sharp ... what a trick :) $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Apr 21, 2022 at 13:24
  • $\begingroup$ Just tried the falloff types until one worked :) my usual method :)) $\endgroup$ Apr 21, 2022 at 14:16
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    $\begingroup$ :) ... with you is my day somehow always better :) $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Apr 21, 2022 at 14:34
  • $\begingroup$ cant loop cut a cone $\endgroup$ Apr 21, 2022 at 17:28
  • $\begingroup$ Hey @guppie :). Just select edges around and subdivide. That's how i did it on my cone. $\endgroup$ Apr 21, 2022 at 19:26
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I've had more experience modeling with CAD tools that use the addition/subtraction of geometric shapes to build up a mesh.

If I was doing this in CAD, I'd round out the nose using something like the following:

enter image description here

  1. Create a sphere with the radius that you want for the tip of your cone.
  2. Position the sphere such that its surface is tangent to the cone.
  3. Subtract the portion of the cone surface from the vertex to the point where it intersects with the sphere. You can also remove the lower portion of the sphere, if it matters.
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    $\begingroup$ I'd actually prefer this approach myself :). It allows a better control of the radius, and better topology if you use a quadsphere :)) $\endgroup$ Apr 22, 2022 at 9:05

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