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This question already has an answer here:

I have a rectangle that grid mesh that I want to subdivide, however, all attempts resulted into the subdivided faces being proportional to the rectangle mesh, I would like to be able to have the rectangle mesh be made up of smaller squares, not rectangles; how would I do this?

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marked as duplicate by Ray Mairlot, Paul Gonet, David, someonewithpc, Daniel Pendergast Feb 20 '15 at 17:26

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  • $\begingroup$ Not a strip, but a larger plane... $\endgroup$ – Victor S Feb 20 '15 at 16:51
  • $\begingroup$ add/remove some edge loops to make faces square, then subdivide. $\endgroup$ – Bithur Feb 20 '15 at 16:52
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Use loop cuts to manually subdivide the first time. CTRL-R

Start by making a certain number of loop cuts across the short side. Just enough to know loop cuts on the long side will result in a square.

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Then make the necessary loop cuts on the long side to complete the square (or close enough to it. In this example, I only needed one more on the long side

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From there, you can subdivide normally and keep your square proportions. If you really want to get perfect about it, and the dimensions of your plane are conducive to it, you could calculate the number of loop cuts needed by subdividing the dimensions of your plane mathmatically. But usually not necessary.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, but I want precise squares, no eyeballing :) $\endgroup$ – Victor S Feb 21 '15 at 0:07
  • $\begingroup$ I thought of something in the meanwhile, just make a square mesh or quad, make it as large as I need it, then subdivide until satisfied, then delete faces on either of the short sides to trim it down to a rectangle, should be left with a rectangle made up of squares. -- frankly this seems like a hack, I wish (I knew of) more precise ways to control subdivisions. $\endgroup$ – Victor S Feb 21 '15 at 0:13

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