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Example

When I create a wireframe modifier, I get these weird lines extending out of my mesh. I am having trouble finding where they come from because this mesh has so many points. Is there an easy way to clean them up?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think this happens when the geometry is too dense for the wireframe's thickness. The cells (empty space between wireframe) eventually closes, and a crease between edges grows exponentially. You could try to use a vertex group, and paint the problematic parts to reduce their wireframe's thickness... $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 11, 2022 at 23:41

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Let's start by testing if those lines lead to vertices that are simply far far away.

Turn on Statistics in your viewport overlays. Select the object, enter edit mode, choose vertices as the component type... Hit [a] to select All vertices. Take note of the Vertices Statistic, something like (for example) 12,546/12,546 (All vertices selected).

Now de-select the vertices you see on-screen. If the statistics show some smaller, non-zero amount of vertices selected ( for example 9/12,546 ) then you can try to snap them back to the group and edit them into place using their neighboring edges to guide you.


enter image description here

Here's some more general info and food for thought...

Check your clipping distances in the Viewport View tab of the "n" panel. Generally, a near clip close to 0 or 1 is normal and a far clip no more than four or five digits is reasonable. When objects are colossal or microscopic, things can get wonky. Make a cube of a known size in the current scene units and "measure" the squirrely object against that.

With an object many kilometers in width and scene units of millimeters, things will get weird the farther you get from the origin.

enter image description here

Check your scene units, too. To a 3D app, one grid is one unit in size. When we give that unit a name, then it must be calculated to scale. So, a fifty kilometer canyon with scene units set to millimeters is going to cause problems as the decimal precision needed to keep track of points gets out of hand. While I'm on the subject, keep your models centered on the origin, especially when scales are large.

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