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I want to reduce the width of the object's opening just as the green line on the screenshot image below (in this case the animal's eyelids). However, because the mesh is already complex, it is difficult for me to reduce it smoothly without destroying the shape. Please let me know if there is a way to do this.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Please note the topology in @Chromarict 's answer, too. If you're animating, and want an easier life later, I would recommend something like that. $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Feb 3, 2022 at 6:06
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    $\begingroup$ @RobinBetts Wow - I've never paid attention to topology before. Thank you so much for letting me know :) $\endgroup$
    – gecko
    Feb 6, 2022 at 2:02

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You could try Proportional Editing by pressing O or clicking the second icon from the right on the header near the top middle of the main viewport:

Proportional Editing UI button

When this is enabled, it makes vertices in an area of influence around your selection somewhat affected by moving and scaling applied to your selection based on their distance from the center of your selection.

For example, if you select one of the corners of your eyelid, you can smoothly adjust the surrounding vertices without moving them all manually. Using a human model I have, I started by selecting a vertex in the corner of the eye and entering grab mode with G. Then I enabled proportional editing with O and adjusted the radius with the mouse wheel.

Eye shape before editing

I then pressed X to only move along the X axis, and moved the vertices over. You could skip locking it to a specific axis if it works better with your eye being angled differently than mine.

Eye shape after editing

As you can see, the vertices nearest to my selection moved the furthest, while ones near the outside of the circle barely moved. This also works for scaling and rotating, so you could try selecting an edge loop around your entire eyelid by alt+clicking an edge and then scaling it with S to see if that works better than moving the corners separately.

Although this method isn't perfect in dense areas, it's definitely a step up from moving every vertex individually. Also if you're having trouble getting things to keep their general shape, try selecting more than one vertex or playing with the radius of influence.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your advice was very helpful. I appreciate it! $\endgroup$
    – gecko
    Feb 3, 2022 at 5:35

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