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I followed this tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KFIs5qip-g& and my car started moving. When I wanted to configure the lighting, I get a warning that Nishita is not available on Eevee. I'm new to making animations so I don't know what to do.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes Nishita doesn't work for Eevee so you either need to switch to the Cycles motor engine (in the Render panel) or use another background for your World $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Commented Jan 2, 2022 at 10:30

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Nishita doesn't work for Eevee (follow moonboots's suggestions) ... if you really want to use Nishita result you can easily render it in Cycles as Panoramic > Equirectangular texture ....

enter image description here

... in OpenEXR 32-bit format ...

enter image description here

... and use it as World texture to light a scene in Eevee.

enter image description here

Cycles – Scene lighted by Nishita node enter image description here

Cycles - Scene lighted by Rendered Texture enter image description here

Eevee - Scene lighted by Rendered Texture enter image description here

... without additional light source like Sun object. To light scene in Eevee with HDRi use Irradiance Volume object with baked Indirect Lightning. A bit tricky with shadows, but it can works in some cases.

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  • $\begingroup$ This will work in many cases, possibly most, but be aware of the differences between using a Nishita sky and using an HDR and yes, that includes HDRS derived from a Nishita sky. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 2, 2022 at 16:44
  • $\begingroup$ It's kind of a weird question and an even weirder answer, IMHO. Nishita is a procedural generated texture, and an HDRI is a baked texture. End of story. There's virtually no end-result difference between using Nishita alone and the same Nishita baked into an HDRI. The rest is only the difference between procedurally generated content and baked data content. It's like asking the difference between the gradient node and the image texture node. $\endgroup$
    – Lauloque
    Commented Jan 2, 2022 at 22:06
  • $\begingroup$ Should have mentioned I was reacting to @MartyFouts comment. Too bad we can't edit them. $\endgroup$
    – Lauloque
    Commented Jan 3, 2022 at 21:26
  • $\begingroup$ @L0Lock The difference between Nishita computation and a simple HDRI is that once you make the Nishita into an HDRI its light contribution to a scene no longer has an atmospheric scattering factor. This doesn't matter in scenes where the distance between the camera and farthest objects is small, like the above example, and is only apparent in scenes where atmospheric haze would be visible. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 3, 2022 at 23:06
  • $\begingroup$ @MartyFouts ... ? Please, can you share blend example to avoid other misunderstanding? Probably the best attach this file to your mentioned link?Thank you a lot $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 10:13

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