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I'd like for my image texture to repeat and taper off similar to a color halftone effect, here is a crude example of what I'm thinking I'd like to do with a cross shape image. Thanks!!

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ This answer is somewhat related, but what makes this one interesting is how to preserve the shape of your custom dots, when scaled to various sizes depending on input tone. You say 'color halftone'. In printing, that is done using 4 screens, rotated and offset with respect to one another, stencilling C,M,Y and K. That would obscure your dot shape, where the dots overlap. Is this what you really want? $\endgroup$ Nov 14 '21 at 15:06
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the link! But yeah I think I might've used the wrong word, color halftone was really the closest I had in mind to describe what I was thinking. What I simply want is to pretty much get that look I put in my example image, so pretty much control the scale of a repeating so that it tapers towards one end. I hope that makes sense haha $\endgroup$ Nov 14 '21 at 15:53
  • $\begingroup$ Do you simply want to produce the example image starting off with a single cross image, or do you want the effect to apply for more elaborate examples? In the latter case, what's missing is some logic based on which the crosses are positioned: as I understand it, the logic is to decrease glyph size while keeping the distance between centers of the glyphs. However, in your example the vertical distance decreases - what gives? Just an imperfection of the example or it has a direction? If so, you need to give a shader the info on that direction... $\endgroup$ Nov 14 '21 at 20:59
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You could take the approach in this answer, substituting a blurred version of your dot-shape for the procedurally-generated square-cell distance-function. Depending on how your original is blurred, it will change shape when thresholds are taken on the intensity of the blurred shape.

Here is a method which scales the dot according to the intensity of the underlying image, instead. You may find, though, that in order to get dots which are sufficiently dark in some cells, your dot-shape would have to be clipped.

enter image description here

This version allows variation between a regular grid pattern for the dots, and a scattered distributuion, by changing the 'Randomness' field in a Voronoi node..

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The nodes colored red allow pretty good control over the input contrast curve, base scale, and scale-multiplier. They may seem partially redundant, but I've found the combination easy to use.

As you can see, it's tricky to get dark-enough areas without clipping or overlapping your dot-shape..

enter image description here

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