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I am trying to make an animation where a sphere drops onto a plane, bounces slightly and then roles to a specific position on the plane.

For the dropping and bouncing I have tried soft body physics with the plane as a collision object.The goal is to have the sphere deformed just a little when hitting the plane.

For the rolling part I have tried a bezier curve from the point where the sphere comes to rest after dropping leading to the target position, using a follow path constraint for the sphere to follow the curve. Both parts on their own work but I cant seem to get them connected. The sphere drops and bounces but then just sits there. I cant figure out how to make move along the curve afterwards. Thank you!

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  • $\begingroup$ Related question: How to move / animate a soft body? $\endgroup$
    – Blunder
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 12:31
  • $\begingroup$ Might be helpful: beginning with Blender 2.9.1( or .2?) most physics can be turned on/off with a "monitor" and "camera" icon in the viewport and in the render. For constraints, there is also an "eye" icon that can turn it on/off. To keyframe these switches hover them with the mouse and press I key. $\endgroup$
    – Blunder
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 12:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Blunder Thanks so much for your second comment, I was just at this moment searching for this when your comment came in. Fantastic :) $\endgroup$
    – Iam Hidari
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 12:50

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I would first bake your soft body animation into keyframes as it is described here: How to bake softbody animation into keyframes?

And after that you can delete the soft body from your object and animate as you need it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks so much. After some initial trouble with the script in your link, I found this one, containing an updated script for Blender 2.91, whicj works like a charm: blender.stackexchange.com/questions/35547/… $\endgroup$
    – Iam Hidari
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 8:24
  • $\begingroup$ Glad you could make it! $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 8:25

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