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I am entirely new to blender. I am trying to create the cover of a closed book, to that end, I have made a mesh that consists of edges and vertices (it is currently only shaped properly on the left of this image, I intend to add a mirror modifier later to fix this):

Mesh

I then extruded this into a 'shell':

Shell

So far, so good.

Next, I want to solidify the faces. This goes badly:

Solidified

I think I understand the issue - each face gets solidified separately, and they therefore extrude different amounts, and along different normals. I just don't know how to fix it. I tried merging the faces into three faces (flat left, flat right, and bent centre), but that just removes all of the shaping.

EDIT:

Object mode -> CTRL-A

Scale

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    $\begingroup$ have you applied scale (CTRL-A and select scale) in object mode? $\endgroup$ Sep 15 at 22:50
  • $\begingroup$ If I press CTRL-A, scale is checked, yes, I'm not sure if that's what you mean $\endgroup$
    – Alex
    Sep 15 at 22:56
  • $\begingroup$ In object mode, CTRL-A should bring up a popup menu. click on Scale to set the scale. $\endgroup$ Sep 15 at 22:57
  • $\begingroup$ I've added a screenshot of what comes up when I do CTRL-A and click on scale $\endgroup$
    – Alex
    Sep 15 at 22:59
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    $\begingroup$ The Solidify modifier has an 'Even Thickness' checkbox just below the 'Thickness' field which might help. $\endgroup$
    – John Eason
    Sep 15 at 23:33
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Maybe your topology is just too dense, especially near the folds. (That might be making duplicate verts, or other faults, harder to find, too.) You could start more simply, and then give the mesh a Subdivision Surface modifier. Below, all with Solidify. Only the outer surface is modelled:

enter image description here

All with Solidify, Bevel modifiers.

  1. Before subdiv. 2. After Subdiv. 3. With the Solidify aimed at a weighted vertex-group to vary thickness.

enter image description here

Trying out the Solidify modes can subtly change where the surface 'kinks', without damaging the topology

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