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Is it possible to simulate a glue-like fluid to stick flat mesh wall? I've tried different settings to make it thicker and slower but it always slides down like wet cement. What should I try that doesn't put too much pressure on even the most beefy computers?

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think there is an actual way to make liquid stick to the wall with default simulations, maybe some addons can give you this possibility... I think it is not possible because you would need to somehow say that surface as well that it is supposed to have maximum friction so that fluid won't move... maybe you can fake it or model it(if it isn't animation) $\endgroup$
    – MikoCG
    Sep 14 at 10:51
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    $\begingroup$ i disagree with MikoCG and i am convinced this is possible. e.g. you could turn off gravity and turn on ForceFields...but i am not sure, what exactly you want. something like this? [1]: i.stack.imgur.com/jEovb.gif $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 14 at 12:42
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    $\begingroup$ and this is an example with mantaflow and just using forces and gravity and viscosity: [1]: i.stack.imgur.com/9FuuQ.gif. But i am still not sure what you want how it should look like...so an image or movie link would be very helpful $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 15 at 12:52
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It is not possible to do this in mantaflow, no. The simulation lacks any setting on effectors that would make such an interaction possible.

The problem is that the stickiness bit is actually a chemical interaction that a fluid simulation doesn't model.

It's probably possible to fake it, depending on what you want the effect for. You can have the simulation generate a mesh, setting the Viscosity and Diffusion in the Domain object as you have been doing and the density of the liquid in the Flow object. After the bake, pick the frame that has the result closest to what you want and use it.

You can also mess with the Field Weights in the Domain object, but I've never found that to be satisfactory. Of course, when you do that, you also reduce the realism of the simulation. At that point you may as well just use a procedural material on the surface objects to 'apply' the liquid.

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  • $\begingroup$ i thought he asked for particles? and then physics fluid? or i misunderstood him... $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 15 at 12:27
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    $\begingroup$ He specifically mentioned Mantaflow as a tag, so he means fluid simulations, yes. Mantaflow is a particle flow simulator that Blender can use to generate a mesh representing the surface of the fluids. Unfortunately for the OP it doesn't simulate interaction between the fluid and object (called 'effectors' in mantaflow) beyond what I described. $\endgroup$ Sep 15 at 14:06
  • $\begingroup$ you are right, didn't see that $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 15 at 14:12

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