0
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

When Y = 1, does it mean that 100% of the rotation is being influenced by the Y-axis? so when Y = 3 its influencing it 300%?

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ For 'axis angle' It seems that only the sign matters (sign of y for instance). $\endgroup$
    – lemon
    Aug 29, 2021 at 10:24
  • $\begingroup$ So what happens if Y=1 and Z = 0.5? Does it just mean that there will be the same rotation about the Y and Z axis? $\endgroup$ Aug 29, 2021 at 10:31
  • $\begingroup$ this is a typical "just try it out" question ;) lemon is right, if just 1 axis has a value unequal to zero. If two axis have a value with non-zero, the values do matter. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Aug 29, 2021 at 12:31

2 Answers 2

2
$\begingroup$

You can think of the axis values as one (direction) vector for the rotation axis. And the angle corresponds to that axis.

So if you have just one component like x, only the direction of that axis influences the rotation. (left/right rotation)

If you change the axis by another (second value) of course the axis changes it's direction and because of that the rotation of the angle will change.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ That clears it up, thank you $\endgroup$ Aug 29, 2021 at 12:51
  • $\begingroup$ You are welcome $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Aug 29, 2021 at 13:45
1
$\begingroup$

The 'Axis' field of the Point Rotate node, is a vector, representing the axis of rotation, in 'Point Space'. The rotation will be around that vector, with its origin at the point.

What I'm calling 'Point Space' is the local space of each point. Before any manipulation, it is aligned to the modified object's axes, for all points. So a rotation around (0,0,1), which is straight up the Z axis of that space, looks like this:

enter image description here

Suppose the points' Z axes have previously been aligned to the normals of the modified object, for example? Then the rotation around (0,0,1) in 'Point Space' would look like this:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .