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I assigned a simple principled bsdf shader to a model of a cup and set the transmission value to 1 and roughness value to 0 to simulate glass. The mesh is set to smooth shading as can be seen in image 3. Also, the image shows the way the mesh is divided up.

I then assigned a new material to the mesh which is defined by the nodes shown in image 2 (hopefully clear enough to read). The model was re-rendered and it appears not to be smooth shaded as the mesh divisions can be seen. It has a flat shaded look rather than smooth shaded. I don't understand why this would change. Does anyone have any clues as to what would be causing this?

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    $\begingroup$ When you rename nodes and hide the contents it makes it hard to figure out what's happening. Anyway, use a Bump node with a very low (.001) distance value. $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 2:55
  • $\begingroup$ Not sure of what is hidden as I got this material out of a blend file that I downloaded and appended into my file. I'm clearly not familiar with the use of shader nodes. But I now understand how this question would be particularly hard to answer. But something is going on with the material. $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 17:07
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As Allen mentioned, it's hard to tell with collapsed nodes (I know it's downloaded and not your fault), however, If I had to guess, I would say the "flat shaded look" is intentional (provided by the Wave Texture), and is meant to replicate those old-fashioned style glasses. That being said, the reason for the "loop cut" look is due to a Normal Map node being used instead of a Bump Node as Allen suggested as well.

Normal Map nodes expect normal data (usually in the form of the purple-ish normal maps most of us are used to). The nodes leading up to the "normal stage" in your graph, only provide B&W values, and therefore cannot facilitate the demands of a Normal Map node. Luckily, this is exactly why the Bump Node exists - to fashion Normal data from a B&W input. Because I don't have access to the "internals" of your node graph, much of my setup is guesswork, and therefore doesn't look exactly the same as yours, however I think you'll agree there's a difference between the results with A Bump Node vs a Normal Map Node:

BUMP NODE (correct): Bump

NORMAL MAP NODE (incorrect): Norm

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