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enter image description here

I've used CTRL+B on the edges of a cube and also did add an edge in the middle of the plane to bevel that(to create the roundness in the middle), then the side ones but I still cant manage to get those straight side planes. Any suggestions?enter image description here

I have also tried to add another edge to the top and bottom faces to create the desired transform, but its not consistent and it depends how far I bevel with the mouse.

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  • $\begingroup$ please add a screenshot with what you have and another with what you want to have. I have no clue what you want... $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jul 19, 2021 at 15:00
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    $\begingroup$ CTRL A > Scale in object mode $\endgroup$
    – Gorgious
    Jul 19, 2021 at 15:07

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Although the other answers are good as well and a way to do it, your idea to use the Bevel Tool was good, too. But as Gorgious and Marty Fouts already explained, your bevel didn't work evenly because you had scaled the object in Object Mode, so you have to apply the scale with Ctrl+A before beveling.

The Bevel Tool has the advantage over the other methods described here, that you don't have to decide beforehand how high the resolution of the curve should be and if you have to build different sized objects like in your example picture, when you know for each one which dimensions it should have, you can start with simple cubes scaled to these dimensions and then create the curve.

First of all, to avoid uneven beveling it is best to scale the mesh to the desired size in Edit Mode because this changes the mesh, but not the object's scale. However, if you want specific dimensions it is easy to enter those values, but then you have to apply the scale as mentioned above.

EDIT: In my example the cube still has its front and back faces, but that doesn't matter for the workflow.

  1. Before beveling, Apply Scale with Ctrl+A in Object Mode so that it's 1 for X, Y and Z.

beveling1

  1. Go to Edit Mode and start beveling with Ctrl+B. If you hit C, Clamp Overlap will be enabled. This way, no matter how far you move the mouse to increase the bevel, it will always stop when the bevel edges meet - if they don't stop, maybe clamping was already enabled. Simply hit C again to toggle clamping on/off.

beveling2

  1. Move the mouse wheel to change the number of segments of the bevel. This way you can decide while beveling how smooth you want the curve to be. At the bottom you can see the number of segments displayed, in case you want to use the same for other objects as well (but usually, once you finished the bevel, this value is used for the next bevel anyway).

beveling3

  1. When you've finished beveling, the "middle" edges where two bevels met now have doubled vertices. To get rid of them, since the edges should still be selected after bevel (or you hit A to Select All), hit M > Merge > By Distance.

beveling4

  1. Another great advantage of this method is, you can first create one cube, select the edges to be beveled in Edit Mode, go back to Object Mode and now duplicate this cube and scale it to the respective dimensions for all the different objects you want to create. Then still in Object Mode select them all and apply all their scales with Ctrl+A. Now with all objects selected you can go to Edit Mode. They should still have the edges selected from the first cube. Now you can bevel them all at once and so all will get the exact same bevel.

beveling5

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Maybe a convenient way to make these shapes would be to create a semicircular arc, EY extend its end edges..

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..pop an Empty at its origin, and make that the axis of a Mirror modifier with 'Bisect' checked.

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Here, a Solidify modifier has been added, which can also set an offset in the 'Rim' material index, for convenience.

Now when you move the Empty, you create variants of the extended circle.

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Try making the shape by connecting two semicircles instead. This guarantees a perfect shape instead of trying to get the bevel to line up correctly.

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  • $\begingroup$ Im mad I didnt think of this before. Thank you $\endgroup$ Jul 19, 2021 at 16:31
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I see that there are already two good answers that explain how to use a circle or cylinder to create the specific object you had in mind, but I'm going to answer the question implied by your approach.

The reason why your bevels are not working properly was hinted at by gorgious in their comment on your answer:

When a bevel doesn't seem to apply properly, especially when the effect is uneven, the odds are very good that you have scaled your cube or other object while you were in object mode.

Having done that, for bevels to work properly you have to apply the scale, which is what gorgious means by "CTRL A > Scale in object mode".

Select the cube while you're in object mode and type CTRLA to apply the scale and your approach with a cube and a bevel should work.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your answer is absolutely correct but I guess the OP is missing the part how the bevel is made here... I'll give it another try. $\endgroup$ Jul 20, 2021 at 6:57

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