4
$\begingroup$

So I'm doing fiddling some different animations, and I want to be able to have one thing kind of squeeze or compress another, like for example, someone punching a pillow and the fist compressing the part it collides with (kind of smooshing it).

I tried soft body physics, but it seems like major overkill for such a simple deformation. It takes forever to bake, there are all kind of artifacts (parts of the mesh jump and vibrate randomly and the deformation isn't smooth). It there just a static deformer I can use, where for example when an object collides with another it just pushes the part it collides with down?

Thanks!

$\endgroup$
1

1 Answer 1

5
$\begingroup$

The physics/cloth/soft body simulations are a bit tricky. Because there are a lot of values and lot of these values depend on each other and if you only change the value of one parameter a little bit - this can ruin your whole animation. But...with some experience and a bit of knowledge you could e.g. try it with cloth:

  1. add a cube, subdivide it a few times and form it in that way, use merge by distance to delete double vertices, shade smooth

enter image description here

  1. add a vertex group with these 4 points, add cloth physics, and uncheck goal and insert your vertex group as pin group, check pressure, value 5

enter image description here

  1. add a sphere, give collision

  2. animate the sphere

result:

enter image description here

enter image description here

i think - but this is just my opinion, it looks pretty nice for 5 mins work and the simulation runs on my computer smooth...

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately, as with all physics simulations, there's lot of random "noise" movement. It's not that noticeable with something this simple, but the pillow is just a start, I want to be able to apply this many other kinds of objects (for example someone sitting on a couch, etc). However, I've been able to solve most of that by turning the dampening up to it's maximum values. This might be the solution, I'm going to test the other proposed idea then see what ends up working better. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 14, 2021 at 18:36

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .