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I am working on an ornate stool and I do not know how to make the beading with out adding tens of thousands of extra faces. I will try anything at the moment enter image description here

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to get something like this:

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you have to follow these steps:

  1. Shift-A -> Curve -> Curve Spirals

If you don't have that menu, go to your preferences and check the add-on:

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  1. change settings to:

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  1. Shift A -> Curve -> Circle and make it bigger

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  1. select your spiral -> object -> convert to mesh

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  1. add skin and subdivision modifiers

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  1. add curve modifier

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  1. material setup:

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video tutorial for modeling: https://youtu.be/Ea4T0VUUA-k

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  • $\begingroup$ I have tried for about 2 hours but when I go to select the circle blender dose not let me use it. Thank you getting this sorted out will be a life saver. $\endgroup$ – Cody Jun 3 at 6:55
  • $\begingroup$ at what step do you have problems? $\endgroup$ – Chris Jun 3 at 7:17
  • $\begingroup$ i added a video tutorial link for the modeling at the end of my answer $\endgroup$ – Chris Jun 3 at 7:36
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To save geometry, this could well be a place for a bump-map. The advantages of geometry, (or displacement-geometry at render time) over bump are roughly:

  • Visible profile / external contour. Not the case here: the beading is tucked in.
  • Parallax / occlusion.. where one bump conceals another. We don't have the viewing angle for that, here.
  • Shadowing. Bump simulates the light-response of the surface, but the bumps don't cast shadows. The difference here is slight:

enter image description here

Left: Bump only, Right: Displacement only.

To use Bump, you would have to make a height-map of your beading. You could model your beading as shown by @Chris, and shoot a tileable map, as shown, for example, here. But as I was doing that, I thought it would be good to have at least a basic 'Beading' shader node-group, to generate the heights procedurally.

The group is based on a semicircular wave:

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.. where, by Pythagoras, Y = sqrt(Radius^2 - X^2). This could be done by putting a Ping Pong wave through a color-ramp, but then the rounded ends in 3D would be fiddly. (At the hemispherical ends, Height = sqrt(Radius^2 - (X^2 + Y^2)).

The group looks like this, inside:

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Sorry about the tangle, squishing into screen-capture doesn't help.

Eventually, in these examples, it's used like this:

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The Gradient node is just to wrap X around the outside of the cylinder's Object Space. You could UV unwrap instead.

The interface isn't silky-smooth; that would take more nodes. Radius sets the thickness of the elements, Tilt: the slope, Length and Y-Scale work against one another.. the higher the Y-Scale, the flatter the ends of the elements. Floor raises a base-level from which the elements protrude, making gaps.

Between them, the parameters can achieve a fair variety of effects .. (All these are Bump only, no Displacement):

enter image description here

The top example puts the output of the group through a color-ramp, for the fancy detail.

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