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I have tried to make a small rigid body animation in Blender 2.92.0, where only one of the objects is floating, while still interacting with the other rigid bodies in the scene, that are falling normal. I have tried every setting in knew about, but I couldn't figure it out. I also tried to use drag but this resulted in all the objects floating, obviously. Their is also no information about such a approach on the internet (at least I couldn't find any). So im wondering if anybody knows a way to achieve this kind of effect. Thanks for your help!

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  • $\begingroup$ I believe you can achieve this by disabling universal gravity in the Scene settings. After that, every body will have its own gravity settings. $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    May 2 at 13:16
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This is related to How can I make scene with multiple gravities going in opposite directions without using a force field?

It used to be that you could move rigid bodies into different layers and they would only be affected by the forces within that layer. This would allow you to create a force (such as Drag) which would only affect some of the objects. However, at later versions of Blender, that functionality is broken - see https://developer.blender.org/T87458.

Once that bug has been addressed it should be possible to have forces affect only certain objects by putting the objects in different Collections.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the answer, I will try that. $\endgroup$ May 2 at 16:43
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When you set the rigid body's properties, you can set its mass. Make the body you want to float lighter than the others. It's the first setting under 'settings' in the physics properties tab

rigid body properties

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  • $\begingroup$ I tried that. Unfortunately the weight of the Objekt can´t be lower then 0 and because the simulated environment in Blender is an vacuum with an constant gravity acceleration of -9.810m/s2 (except you change it), the weight has no effect on the objects falling speed. Therefore you would need to simulate air resistance and buoyancy. But never the les, thank you for the idea. $\endgroup$ May 2 at 16:42

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