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I would like to know how Blender defines its global reference frame, and if it is possible to modify its definition.

By reference point, I mean the x, y and z axes that we can see at any time when we model objects.

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No. However, by theory of relativity, you can achieve the exact same effect by placing the 3D cursor at the origin (Shift+C), setting the transform orientation from “median point” to “3D cursor,” selecting all, and then transforming.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer. But my question was more about how blender defines its reference frame. Do you know a mathematical definition? For example, I notice that the definition of the x and y axis with Blender corresponds to -x and -y axis with Matlab. I am searching the mathematical definition of the frame/ origin of Blender. $\endgroup$
    – Noella
    May 3 at 9:09
  • $\begingroup$ Umm, the definition of… I’m lost. As far as I know, the choosing of which axis is positive and which one is negative, and what directions they correspond to in the real world, is entirely arbitrary. I think what you’re really asking is, is there a way to change which axes directions are positive and negative, because you’ve learned it one way in a different program and blender is another. $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    May 3 at 12:00
  • $\begingroup$ Yes it is something like that. Moreover, the rotation between the frames are different. I would like to characterize this difference (rotations of the axis and their locations). However to do that, I need to know how Blender defines its frame. It means, mathematically, what is the definition of its frame? Do you know the definition of the origin in term of coordinates, ect? Sorry if my question is unclear. I do not really how to define it properly. $\endgroup$
    – Noella
    May 4 at 9:10
  • $\begingroup$ Does this help you? blender.stackexchange.com/q/221353/73575 $\endgroup$
    – TheLabCat
    May 4 at 9:19
  • $\begingroup$ Not really. Here you have the mathematical definition of the camera frame according to the fundamental frame of Blender. What I am searching is the definition of this fundamental frame, namely, if I take this example, you have the rotation of your camera according a fundamental frame defined by Blender before any transformations. My question is do you know how to define, characterises this frame? $\endgroup$
    – Noella
    May 4 at 9:31

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