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I want to do a pretty simple animation. A fixed camera, an object, a sun which revolves around the object with a circular path and an image plane behind the object acting as a background/environment. But the sun makes shadows on the plane as well. Is there an option to exclude the image plane from the physics of the light source? I'm very new to blender and I'm sure this is a very straightforward thing to do. Thank you!

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  • $\begingroup$ For your plane material, you could use an Emission shader instead of a Diffuse or Principled BSDF, this way it won't receive any shadow $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 11:51

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If I understand you correctly, you want the background plane to be unshaded. You could use a material that does not use a shader node, by creating a new material, removing the Principled BSDF node, then connecting a node like RGB or a texture node to the Surface output. Note, this would make it so that it would not interact with any light source. If you want it to interact with a light source, you would have to use Layers (Top Right) and then merge them together using the compositor and nodes. You can choose which things interact in layers using collections, by disabling what you don't want to affect the objects in your scene. Good luck!

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Use an emission shader for your image and a transparent/mix shader to make it transparent

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi, thanks for the post. This site is not a regular forum, answers should be substantial, stand on their own, and thoroughly explain the solution and required steps. One liners and short tips rarely make for a good answer. If you can edit your post and provide some more details about the procedure and how it works, perhaps add a few images illustrating some steps and final result. See How to write a good answer?, otherwise it may be converted to a comment. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 28, 2022 at 9:02

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