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I am a bit of a novice when it comes to Blender and I'm having trouble fixing a very noticeable seam on a mirrored object (a head).

I've checked to see if there's vertices that haven't been merged near the seam to no such luck. I've changed the order of the modifiers (mirror and subdivision surface). "Clipping" and "Merge" are both enabled within the mirror modifier too. I've even copied and pasted one side of the head, flipped it and then tried to merge the vertices but that won't work either.

enter image description here

I hope this isn't a silly question, but I'm only a university student and would really appreciate the help!

Thank you! :)

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    $\begingroup$ Does selecting everything and hitting Shift+N to recalculate the normals fix it? $\endgroup$ – Jummit Mar 18 at 20:37
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    $\begingroup$ Try moving the subdiv after the mirror modifier. Also, make sure you don't have interior faces. In edit mode go Select > Select all by trait > Interior faces $\endgroup$ – Gorgious Mar 18 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ Also: blender.stackexchange.com/questions/69020/… $\endgroup$ – brockmann Mar 19 at 8:32
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Its caused by the subdivision modifier being used before the mirror modifier. Click and hold on the 6 dots by the top right of the modifier and drag the mirror modifier above the subdivision mod.

I am not 100% sure why having them in the wrong order makes that line appear, but changing the order fixed it for me. Also, it appears the line gets more pronounced the more subdivisions you have. enter image description here enter image description here

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The order in your modifier stack is the order that these operations are applied to your mesh.

So if you use Subdivision Surface first, you create a smooth mesh with a hard edge, and then Mirror replicates that over the axis.

enter image description here

It's as though you had two empty halves of coconuts, and you're banging them together.

Whereas if you first Mirror your base mesh, you're free to subdivide the whole thing afterwards.

enter image description here

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